Effect of water regimes and planting dates on growth and development of corn, sorghum and pearl millet

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191873
Title:
Effect of water regimes and planting dates on growth and development of corn, sorghum and pearl millet
Author:
Ben Hammouda, Moncef,1955-
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relative responses of corn (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) to water stress and planting dates effects were studied. Two hybrids each of corn and sorghum and two inbred lines of pearl millet were grown from two planting dates of mid-May and mid-July under wet and dry soil moisture conditions. Water stress reduced plant heights, seed volume weight (except within the May planting, water stress increased seed volume-weight for sorghum), seed weight, and forage yield with less effect than for grain yield. Mid-July planting reduced the number of days to anthesis and heights of pearl millet and sorghum plants while it did increase the height of corn plants. Mid-May planting appeared to increase seed volume-weight and seed weight. Crops yielded more when planted in May except for pearl millet which yielded better under dry conditions when planted in July.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Grain -- Planting time.; Grain -- Water requirements.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Voigt, Robert L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of water regimes and planting dates on growth and development of corn, sorghum and pearl milleten_US
dc.creatorBen Hammouda, Moncef,1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBen Hammouda, Moncef,1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe relative responses of corn (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) to water stress and planting dates effects were studied. Two hybrids each of corn and sorghum and two inbred lines of pearl millet were grown from two planting dates of mid-May and mid-July under wet and dry soil moisture conditions. Water stress reduced plant heights, seed volume weight (except within the May planting, water stress increased seed volume-weight for sorghum), seed weight, and forage yield with less effect than for grain yield. Mid-July planting reduced the number of days to anthesis and heights of pearl millet and sorghum plants while it did increase the height of corn plants. Mid-May planting appeared to increase seed volume-weight and seed weight. Crops yielded more when planted in May except for pearl millet which yielded better under dry conditions when planted in July.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGrain -- Planting time.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGrain -- Water requirements.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVoigt, Robert L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHofmann, Wallace C.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213416312en_US
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