Mountain-front recharge from the Santa Rita Mountains to the Tucson Basin

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191870
Title:
Mountain-front recharge from the Santa Rita Mountains to the Tucson Basin
Author:
Merz, August.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study analyzes mountain-front recharge from the Santa Rita mountains. Trilinear diagrams, finger-print diagrams, and scattergrams suggest that two types of water recharge the regional aquifer by effluent seepage as Madera Canyon Stream flows onto Madera Canyon fan. One type of water is dominated by calcium and bicarbonate ions, and the other type is dominated by calcium and sulfate ions. Deuterium and oxygen-18 data support these interpretations and indicate that recharge occurs over a broad range of elevations. Furthermore, the isotopic data indicate that the deuterium and oxygen-18 gradients are -3.5 0/00 and -0.4 0/00, respectively, per 1000 foot increase. Evidence is lacking for the presence of deeply circulating waters. Calculations based on a flow-net analysis and a water balance approximate annual mountain-front recharge to be between 200 and 400 ac-ft/yr/mi of mountain-front recharge. Recharge studies from the nearby Santa Catalina mountains estimate recharge to be between 25 and 50 ac-ft/yr/mi of mountain front and present evidence for minor amounts of deep circulation through the mountain block into the basin. The Santa Rita Mountains, significantly, have a more permeable alluvial fan which favors recharge.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater -- Arizona -- Pima County.; Groundwater -- Arizona -- Santa Cruz County.; Rain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Santa Rita Mountains.; Water-supply -- Arizona -- Pima County.; Water-supply -- Arizona -- Santa Cruz County.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Davis, Stanley N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMountain-front recharge from the Santa Rita Mountains to the Tucson Basinen_US
dc.creatorMerz, August.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMerz, August.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzes mountain-front recharge from the Santa Rita mountains. Trilinear diagrams, finger-print diagrams, and scattergrams suggest that two types of water recharge the regional aquifer by effluent seepage as Madera Canyon Stream flows onto Madera Canyon fan. One type of water is dominated by calcium and bicarbonate ions, and the other type is dominated by calcium and sulfate ions. Deuterium and oxygen-18 data support these interpretations and indicate that recharge occurs over a broad range of elevations. Furthermore, the isotopic data indicate that the deuterium and oxygen-18 gradients are -3.5 0/00 and -0.4 0/00, respectively, per 1000 foot increase. Evidence is lacking for the presence of deeply circulating waters. Calculations based on a flow-net analysis and a water balance approximate annual mountain-front recharge to be between 200 and 400 ac-ft/yr/mi of mountain-front recharge. Recharge studies from the nearby Santa Catalina mountains estimate recharge to be between 25 and 50 ac-ft/yr/mi of mountain front and present evidence for minor amounts of deep circulation through the mountain block into the basin. The Santa Rita Mountains, significantly, have a more permeable alluvial fan which favors recharge.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Arizona -- Pima County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Arizona -- Santa Cruz County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Santa Rita Mountains.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply -- Arizona -- Pima County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply -- Arizona -- Santa Cruz County.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, L. G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213297904en_US
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