Criteria and methods of analysis for regulation for interference between wells

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191846
Title:
Criteria and methods of analysis for regulation for interference between wells
Author:
Esposito, David M.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Groundwater laws in the western states are generally based on the appropriation doctrine. These statutes usually allow new withdrawals of groundwater, provided that the amount of interference with neighboring wells is reasonable. Proposed withdrawals are typically approved or denied on the basis of hydrologic projections. This procedure can provide reasonable protection to existing groundwater users, an objective of the appropriation doctrine. However, it can also discourage the economic and social development of an area, contrary to another objective of the appropriation doctrine. As an alternative system, it is proposed that new withdrawals generally be allowed. It is proposed that well interference projections be used with other data to establish cost increases of senior water users as a result of new withdrawals, and that these costs then be reimbursed by the new user. This procedure is believed to be more consistent with appropriation doctrine objectives.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater flow -- Law and legislation -- West (U.S.); Groundwater flow -- West (U.S.)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harshbarger, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCriteria and methods of analysis for regulation for interference between wellsen_US
dc.creatorEsposito, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEsposito, David M.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGroundwater laws in the western states are generally based on the appropriation doctrine. These statutes usually allow new withdrawals of groundwater, provided that the amount of interference with neighboring wells is reasonable. Proposed withdrawals are typically approved or denied on the basis of hydrologic projections. This procedure can provide reasonable protection to existing groundwater users, an objective of the appropriation doctrine. However, it can also discourage the economic and social development of an area, contrary to another objective of the appropriation doctrine. As an alternative system, it is proposed that new withdrawals generally be allowed. It is proposed that well interference projections be used with other data to establish cost increases of senior water users as a result of new withdrawals, and that these costs then be reimbursed by the new user. This procedure is believed to be more consistent with appropriation doctrine objectives.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater flow -- Law and legislation -- West (U.S.)en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater flow -- West (U.S.)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarshbarger, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213391310en_US
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