Multiple linear regression models for predicting trihalomethane formation from chlorinated natural waters

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191821
Title:
Multiple linear regression models for predicting trihalomethane formation from chlorinated natural waters
Author:
Fraas, Tracy Beth.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A USEPA survey in 1975 found trihalomethanes (THMs) to be widespread in chlorinated drinking water. A subsequent study identified humic substances as probable precursors. In 1976, the National Cancer Institute found chloroform to cause cancer in laboratory rats. Consequently, the USEPA set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 100 pg/1 for total THMs in drinking water systems. THM formation reactions between chlorine and humic substances have been studied but are not completely understood. Parameters found to affect THM formation rate and concentration are raw water pH, temperature, and bromide level; precursor source and concentration, chlorine dose, and chlorine contact (reaction) time. This research involved the formulation of empirically derived models, enabling THM prediction as a function of time and parameters, for natural waters. Kinetic experiments, designed to vary parameters, were conducted on seven geographically diverse natural waters. THM concentrations were analyzed by gas chromatography. Models were developed using multiple linear regression. Three predictive models were chosen based on statistical analysis and were tested on four natural waters. All models predicted well for ambient water conditions. No single model predicted better overall. Variations in the "reactivity" of waters due to precursor source were not adequately predicted, nor were chlorine-limited conditions.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Trihalomethanes -- Mathematical models.; Water -- Pollution -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Amy, Gary L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMultiple linear regression models for predicting trihalomethane formation from chlorinated natural watersen_US
dc.creatorFraas, Tracy Beth.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFraas, Tracy Beth.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA USEPA survey in 1975 found trihalomethanes (THMs) to be widespread in chlorinated drinking water. A subsequent study identified humic substances as probable precursors. In 1976, the National Cancer Institute found chloroform to cause cancer in laboratory rats. Consequently, the USEPA set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 100 pg/1 for total THMs in drinking water systems. THM formation reactions between chlorine and humic substances have been studied but are not completely understood. Parameters found to affect THM formation rate and concentration are raw water pH, temperature, and bromide level; precursor source and concentration, chlorine dose, and chlorine contact (reaction) time. This research involved the formulation of empirically derived models, enabling THM prediction as a function of time and parameters, for natural waters. Kinetic experiments, designed to vary parameters, were conducted on seven geographically diverse natural waters. THM concentrations were analyzed by gas chromatography. Models were developed using multiple linear regression. Three predictive models were chosen based on statistical analysis and were tested on four natural waters. All models predicted well for ambient water conditions. No single model predicted better overall. Variations in the "reactivity" of waters due to precursor source were not adequately predicted, nor were chlorine-limited conditions.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTrihalomethanes -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Pollution -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAmy, Gary L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213297356en_US
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