Effect of direction of thunderstorm movement on peak discharge in a long narrow southeastern Arizona watershed

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191818
Title:
Effect of direction of thunderstorm movement on peak discharge in a long narrow southeastern Arizona watershed
Author:
Helble, Timothy Kirk.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Thunderstorms in the southwestern United States move significant distances during their life cycle. Due to regional geologic characteristics, small watersheds in southeastern Arizona valleys are typically long and narrow, and direction of thunderstorm movement across such watersheds may have a significant effect on peak discharge rate. Recording rain gage data from thunderstorms occurring over a long narrow watershed near Tombstone, Arizona was analyzed to verify that they can move appreciable distances. A conceptual distributed rainfall-runoff model was modified-to simulate hydrologic processes in a semi-arid area, and calibrated and checked using data from 17 major events. Actual movement direction was estimated for five major thunderstorms. Data from these storms was recentered over five points along the length of the watershed and rotated in eight different directions, and results were passed to the rainfall-runoff model to demonstrate the effect of direction of thunderstorm movement on peak discharge rate. When the storms were centered over the watershed centroid, simulated peak flows were significantly higher for downbasin movement of two storms, slightly higher for downbasin movement of one storm, and slightly higher for upbasin movement of two storms. Possible reasons for these findings were investigated.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Thunderstorms -- Arizona -- Cochise County.; Thunderstorms -- Arizona -- Walnut Gulch Region.; Rain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Cochise County.; Rain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Walnut Gulch Region.; Watersheds -- Arizona -- Cochise County.; Watersheds -- Arizona -- Walnut Gulch Region.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fogel, Martin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of direction of thunderstorm movement on peak discharge in a long narrow southeastern Arizona watersheden_US
dc.creatorHelble, Timothy Kirk.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHelble, Timothy Kirk.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThunderstorms in the southwestern United States move significant distances during their life cycle. Due to regional geologic characteristics, small watersheds in southeastern Arizona valleys are typically long and narrow, and direction of thunderstorm movement across such watersheds may have a significant effect on peak discharge rate. Recording rain gage data from thunderstorms occurring over a long narrow watershed near Tombstone, Arizona was analyzed to verify that they can move appreciable distances. A conceptual distributed rainfall-runoff model was modified-to simulate hydrologic processes in a semi-arid area, and calibrated and checked using data from 17 major events. Actual movement direction was estimated for five major thunderstorms. Data from these storms was recentered over five points along the length of the watershed and rotated in eight different directions, and results were passed to the rainfall-runoff model to demonstrate the effect of direction of thunderstorm movement on peak discharge rate. When the storms were centered over the watershed centroid, simulated peak flows were significantly higher for downbasin movement of two storms, slightly higher for downbasin movement of one storm, and slightly higher for upbasin movement of two storms. Possible reasons for these findings were investigated.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshThunderstorms -- Arizona -- Cochise County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshThunderstorms -- Arizona -- Walnut Gulch Region.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Cochise County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Walnut Gulch Region.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatersheds -- Arizona -- Cochise County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatersheds -- Arizona -- Walnut Gulch Region.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThames, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReich, Brian M.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc12593625en_US
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