Yield and physiological aspects of 17 varieties of corn grown in runoff farming

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191813
Title:
Yield and physiological aspects of 17 varieties of corn grown in runoff farming
Author:
BassiriRad, H.(Hormoz)
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A micro-catchment water harvesting agrisystem in Avra Valley, west of Tucson, Arizona, was utilized to grow 17 varieties of drought tolerant corn (Zea mays). The primary objective of this study was to isolate and evaluate the grain yield performance of these cultivars. Additional measurements were also taken on transpiration rate (TR), leaf water potential (0), stress degree day (SDD), and crop water stress index (CWSI), during the period 24 October to 2 November, between two irrigations, in search of possible physiological mechanisms of drought adaptability and their impact on production. The system's performance in terms of economical crop growth is subject to further research. The analysis of grain yield indicates a significant varietal difference. Physiological parameters monitored also show trends of differences among cultivars. It was found that cultivars capable of maintaining a higher plant water content, by preserving their TR, Ψ1, CWSI, and SDD are not necessarily the better yielding cultivars. Possible justifications of this phenomena are discussed. It is suggested that a distinction has to be made between crop adaptability to drought and preservation of a high grain yield since under limited moisture conditions, one might be attained through the suppression of the other.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Arid regions agriculture -- Arizona -- Avra Valley.; Arid regions agriculture -- Arizona -- Pima County.; Corn -- Drought tolerance.; Corn -- Water requirements.; Irrigation -- Tailwater recovery systems -- Arizona -- Avra Valley.; Irrigation -- Tailwater recovery systems -- Arizona -- Pima County.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soils, Water and Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Stroehlein, Jack L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleYield and physiological aspects of 17 varieties of corn grown in runoff farmingen_US
dc.creatorBassiriRad, H.(Hormoz)en_US
dc.contributor.authorBassiriRad, H.(Hormoz)en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA micro-catchment water harvesting agrisystem in Avra Valley, west of Tucson, Arizona, was utilized to grow 17 varieties of drought tolerant corn (Zea mays). The primary objective of this study was to isolate and evaluate the grain yield performance of these cultivars. Additional measurements were also taken on transpiration rate (TR), leaf water potential (0), stress degree day (SDD), and crop water stress index (CWSI), during the period 24 October to 2 November, between two irrigations, in search of possible physiological mechanisms of drought adaptability and their impact on production. The system's performance in terms of economical crop growth is subject to further research. The analysis of grain yield indicates a significant varietal difference. Physiological parameters monitored also show trends of differences among cultivars. It was found that cultivars capable of maintaining a higher plant water content, by preserving their TR, Ψ1, CWSI, and SDD are not necessarily the better yielding cultivars. Possible justifications of this phenomena are discussed. It is suggested that a distinction has to be made between crop adaptability to drought and preservation of a high grain yield since under limited moisture conditions, one might be attained through the suppression of the other.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshArid regions agriculture -- Arizona -- Avra Valley.en_US
dc.subject.lcshArid regions agriculture -- Arizona -- Pima County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCorn -- Drought tolerance.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCorn -- Water requirements.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIrrigation -- Tailwater recovery systems -- Arizona -- Avra Valley.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIrrigation -- Tailwater recovery systems -- Arizona -- Pima County.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoils, Water and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStroehlein, Jack L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatthias, Allan D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213296675en_US
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