Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191791
Title:
Thermonuclear chlorine-36 in arid soil
Author:
Trotman, Kenneth Neil.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Thermonuclear bomb testing in the 1950's and 1960's produced a significant amount of chlorine-36 (C1-36). This anthropogenic C1-36 pulse has been proposed as a tool in dating ground water and as an environmental tracer. The feasibility of bomb C1-36 as a hydrologic tool in the unsaturated zone was studied. Soil samples were collected from a vertical auger hole drilled to 5 m near Socorro, New Mexico. A distinct C1-36 pulse was located at 1.125 m depth indicating a mean vertical moisture velocity of 4.5 cm/yr. The calculated mean seepage rate of 2.8 mm/yr indicates only 1.2% of the annual rainfall percolates to 1 meter. Below 2 m depth the C1-36/C1 ratio is relatively constant, averaging 717 x 10⁻¹⁵ and represents the prebomb production rate of subsurface and cosmogenic C1-36. Total bomb C1-36 fallout in the soil profile was 7.4 x 10¹¹ C1-36 atoms/m². The author feels C1-36 will be a useful tool in recharge studies of the unsaturated zone.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Nuclear weapons -- Testing -- Environmental aspects -- New Mexico -- Socorro Region.; Groundwater flow.; Soils -- Chlorine content.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Davis, Stanley N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThermonuclear chlorine-36 in arid soilen_US
dc.creatorTrotman, Kenneth Neil.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrotman, Kenneth Neil.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThermonuclear bomb testing in the 1950's and 1960's produced a significant amount of chlorine-36 (C1-36). This anthropogenic C1-36 pulse has been proposed as a tool in dating ground water and as an environmental tracer. The feasibility of bomb C1-36 as a hydrologic tool in the unsaturated zone was studied. Soil samples were collected from a vertical auger hole drilled to 5 m near Socorro, New Mexico. A distinct C1-36 pulse was located at 1.125 m depth indicating a mean vertical moisture velocity of 4.5 cm/yr. The calculated mean seepage rate of 2.8 mm/yr indicates only 1.2% of the annual rainfall percolates to 1 meter. Below 2 m depth the C1-36/C1 ratio is relatively constant, averaging 717 x 10⁻¹⁵ and represents the prebomb production rate of subsurface and cosmogenic C1-36. Total bomb C1-36 fallout in the soil profile was 7.4 x 10¹¹ C1-36 atoms/m². The author feels C1-36 will be a useful tool in recharge studies of the unsaturated zone.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNuclear weapons -- Testing -- Environmental aspects -- New Mexico -- Socorro Region.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater flow.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSoils -- Chlorine content.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213093141en_US
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