Stable oxygen and sulfur isotopes applied to tracing seepage from mine tailings [electronci resource]

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191770
Title:
Stable oxygen and sulfur isotopes applied to tracing seepage from mine tailings [electronci resource]
Author:
Ries, Kimberly Sue.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sulfur and oxygen isotopes in dissolved sulfates were used to trace seepage from a uranium tailings pond into a shallow alluvial aquifer. Twent7-two wells, 2 tailings ponds, and an adjacent stream were sampled on and nearby the Kerr-McGee Nuclear Corporation section 31 millsite at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The isotopic analyses showed significant isotopic differences between acid pond sulfates contributed by the mill process and natural sulfates in the local ground waters. Three distinct groups of waters were identified in the alluvial system at different points downgradient from the millsite, pond leachate, mine discharge, and Tres Hermanos formation waters. This distinct grouping of waters would not have been possible based only on chemical data. Isotope results also provided clues to the types and extent of geochemical interactions occurring as water travels from ponds into an aquifer system.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Isotope geology -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.; Groundwater -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.; Seepage -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.; Uranium mill tailings -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Long, Austin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStable oxygen and sulfur isotopes applied to tracing seepage from mine tailings [electronci resource]en_US
dc.creatorRies, Kimberly Sue.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRies, Kimberly Sue.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSulfur and oxygen isotopes in dissolved sulfates were used to trace seepage from a uranium tailings pond into a shallow alluvial aquifer. Twent7-two wells, 2 tailings ponds, and an adjacent stream were sampled on and nearby the Kerr-McGee Nuclear Corporation section 31 millsite at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The isotopic analyses showed significant isotopic differences between acid pond sulfates contributed by the mill process and natural sulfates in the local ground waters. Three distinct groups of waters were identified in the alluvial system at different points downgradient from the millsite, pond leachate, mine discharge, and Tres Hermanos formation waters. This distinct grouping of waters would not have been possible based only on chemical data. Isotope results also provided clues to the types and extent of geochemical interactions occurring as water travels from ponds into an aquifer system.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIsotope geology -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSeepage -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUranium mill tailings -- New Mexico -- Ambrosia Lake.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLong, Austinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Glenn M.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212909699en_US
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