Water-harvesting on arid coal mine soil for vegetable and fruit production

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191757
Title:
Water-harvesting on arid coal mine soil for vegetable and fruit production
Author:
Powelson, David.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Black Mesa Water-Harvesting Agrisystem is testing the feasibility of using water-harvesting techniques to reclaim strip mined land. Two different treatments, fiberglass-asphalt-chipcoat and salt, were applied to increase the runoff from the catchment areas. The water is stored in ponds to provide ample irrigation to a variety of vegetables and fruits. This system would generate an estimated net annual revenue of $1400 per irrigated acre or approximately $348 per acre for the whole system. This income is a great improvement over the estimate of no net income from the conventional reclamation alternative of establishing forage. The potential high quality of Black Mesa spoil as agricultural soil is indicated by its loam texture, neutral pH, and high nitrogen level. After three years of fertilization with phosphate, irrigation, cropping and cultivation, the spoil is developing a friable, granular structure. Some of the problems encountered in operating the system are: land subsidence on the regraded spoil, crop pests, and weed growth on the catchments. Nevertheless, it appears that the establishment of water-harvesting instead of, or in conjunction with, grazing would increase the future benefits from the land without increasing the costs of reclamation.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Strip mining -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County); Coal mine waste -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County); Spoil banks.; Reclamation of land -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County); Irrigation water -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Thames, John L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWater-harvesting on arid coal mine soil for vegetable and fruit productionen_US
dc.creatorPowelson, David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPowelson, David.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Black Mesa Water-Harvesting Agrisystem is testing the feasibility of using water-harvesting techniques to reclaim strip mined land. Two different treatments, fiberglass-asphalt-chipcoat and salt, were applied to increase the runoff from the catchment areas. The water is stored in ponds to provide ample irrigation to a variety of vegetables and fruits. This system would generate an estimated net annual revenue of $1400 per irrigated acre or approximately $348 per acre for the whole system. This income is a great improvement over the estimate of no net income from the conventional reclamation alternative of establishing forage. The potential high quality of Black Mesa spoil as agricultural soil is indicated by its loam texture, neutral pH, and high nitrogen level. After three years of fertilization with phosphate, irrigation, cropping and cultivation, the spoil is developing a friable, granular structure. Some of the problems encountered in operating the system are: land subsidence on the regraded spoil, crop pests, and weed growth on the catchments. Nevertheless, it appears that the establishment of water-harvesting instead of, or in conjunction with, grazing would increase the future benefits from the land without increasing the costs of reclamation.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStrip mining -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County)en_US
dc.subject.lcshCoal mine waste -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County)en_US
dc.subject.lcshSpoil banks.en_US
dc.subject.lcshReclamation of land -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County)en_US
dc.subject.lcshIrrigation water -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairThames, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCluff, C. Brenten_US
dc.identifier.oclc10709501en_US
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