Response of eldar (Pinus brutia var. eldarica) and brutia pine (P. brutia) to trickle irrigation in an arid land Christmas tree plantation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191746
Title:
Response of eldar (Pinus brutia var. eldarica) and brutia pine (P. brutia) to trickle irrigation in an arid land Christmas tree plantation
Author:
Sloss, Reed John.
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Arizona imports a far larger number of Christmas trees than it produces each year primarily because local tree farmers have not as yet found suitable species and cultural techniques for growing Christmas trees in Arizona's harsh climate. A relatively new technique which involves growing drought resistant conifers in irrigated plantations near urban centers was tested using the exotic species eldar (Pinus brutia var. eldarica) and brutia pine (P. brutia). After two and one half years of growth, eldar pine produced larger and better quality Christmas trees than three brutia provenances tested. These resultS. were statistically significant when mean multiple comparison tests were applied to the variables height and a Christmas tree quality index. Tree response to growing conditions on the plantation was quite variable. A few eldar pines were large and well formed enough to be marketable during the 1980 Christmas season. Most trees will require another growing season. However, some trees from each provenance tested were obviously stunted and may never produce marketable trees. Possible explanations for these results include a lack of mycorrhizal infections on stunted pines, a differential tree response to under- or overwatering, or local differences in soil fertility.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Christmas trees -- Arizona.; Pine -- Arizona -- Growth.; Microirrigation.; Tree farms -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Knorr, Philip N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleResponse of eldar (Pinus brutia var. eldarica) and brutia pine (P. brutia) to trickle irrigation in an arid land Christmas tree plantationen_US
dc.creatorSloss, Reed John.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSloss, Reed John.en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractArizona imports a far larger number of Christmas trees than it produces each year primarily because local tree farmers have not as yet found suitable species and cultural techniques for growing Christmas trees in Arizona's harsh climate. A relatively new technique which involves growing drought resistant conifers in irrigated plantations near urban centers was tested using the exotic species eldar (Pinus brutia var. eldarica) and brutia pine (P. brutia). After two and one half years of growth, eldar pine produced larger and better quality Christmas trees than three brutia provenances tested. These resultS. were statistically significant when mean multiple comparison tests were applied to the variables height and a Christmas tree quality index. Tree response to growing conditions on the plantation was quite variable. A few eldar pines were large and well formed enough to be marketable during the 1980 Christmas season. Most trees will require another growing season. However, some trees from each provenance tested were obviously stunted and may never produce marketable trees. Possible explanations for these results include a lack of mycorrhizal infections on stunted pines, a differential tree response to under- or overwatering, or local differences in soil fertility.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChristmas trees -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPine -- Arizona -- Growth.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMicroirrigation.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTree farms -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKnorr, Philip N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLehman, Gordon S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZwolinski, Malcolm J.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212890779en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.