Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191745
Title:
The federal nongame act and its implications for Arizona
Author:
Jeffery, Eileen Feeney.
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Federal Nongame Act is analyzed, implications raised by the legislation are discussed and issues facing Arizona's nongame program are presented. Nongame programs implemented in other states are also summarized. The Nongame Act evolved because of a need to bring attention to the country's nongame wildlife resource. Eighty-five percent of all wildlife species are considered nongame species, and many people believe that states are not adequately managing these species. Statutory language of the Act is vague and it appears discretion is to be left with the states to implement major provisions. The Act is clear however in providing incentive for states to develop comprehensive wildlife management plans covering all wildlife, both game and nongame species, and also encouraging states to establish their own nongame funding sources. Although several states have successfully implemented nongame programs, many states including Arizona are encountering problems. A needs assessment survey was administered to several Arizona conservation organizations to evaluate potential for citizen input. The results of this survey indicate that Arizona's nongame program should be expanded. Nongame funding should come from a flexible and voluntary program, additional nongame personnel should be hired and nongame problem areas and priorities should be identified by these experts based on the biology of the species.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Wildlife conservation -- Law and legislation -- United States.; Wildlife conservation -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Shaw, William W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe federal nongame act and its implications for Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorJeffery, Eileen Feeney.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJeffery, Eileen Feeney.en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Federal Nongame Act is analyzed, implications raised by the legislation are discussed and issues facing Arizona's nongame program are presented. Nongame programs implemented in other states are also summarized. The Nongame Act evolved because of a need to bring attention to the country's nongame wildlife resource. Eighty-five percent of all wildlife species are considered nongame species, and many people believe that states are not adequately managing these species. Statutory language of the Act is vague and it appears discretion is to be left with the states to implement major provisions. The Act is clear however in providing incentive for states to develop comprehensive wildlife management plans covering all wildlife, both game and nongame species, and also encouraging states to establish their own nongame funding sources. Although several states have successfully implemented nongame programs, many states including Arizona are encountering problems. A needs assessment survey was administered to several Arizona conservation organizations to evaluate potential for citizen input. The results of this survey indicate that Arizona's nongame program should be expanded. Nongame funding should come from a flexible and voluntary program, additional nongame personnel should be hired and nongame problem areas and priorities should be identified by these experts based on the biology of the species.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWildlife conservation -- Law and legislation -- United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWildlife conservation -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairShaw, William W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCortner, Hanna J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212844397en_US
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