An economic analysis of crop-water production functions : California

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191732
Title:
An economic analysis of crop-water production functions : California
Author:
Kelly, Sharon.
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Water conservation has become an increasingly important issue in much of the arid West and in California in particular. Governmental agencies are interested in instituting policies which will help conserve water (reduce water application levels on a per acre basis). Some of the policies include water pricing, tax credits and/or subsidies for improving field and irrigation delivery efficiencies, reductions in available irrigation water and use of the extension service as a means of conveying water-saving techniques and technologies to farmers. The effects of the above policies on farmer profits, returns over total variable costs and quantities of water conserved are examined for three crops grown in California - corn, cotton, and processing tomatoes. The results show that there is potential for conserving water in California through implementation of governmental policies. Water pricing policies could be effective on all crops if the price changes are dramatic rather than marginal. Improvements in field and delivery efficiencies for furrow irrigated crops could conserve water and improve farmers' returns over total variable costs. Improving field efficiencies for sprinkler irrigated crops could conserve some water, but farmers returns over total variable costs are only marginally improved. Reductions in available water will clearly conserve water. The effects on farmer profits, however, vary with the type of crop, type of irrigation and location of the farm. Using the extension service to encourage farmers to irrigate at profit maximizing levels rather than at the levels currently being used could conserve water and marginally improve profits.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Corn -- Irrigation -- Economic aspects.; Cotton -- Irrigation -- Economic aspects.; Tomatoes -- Irrigation -- Economic aspects.; Irrigation farming -- Economic aspects -- California.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Agricultural Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ayer, Harry W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn economic analysis of crop-water production functions : Californiaen_US
dc.creatorKelly, Sharon.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Sharon.en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWater conservation has become an increasingly important issue in much of the arid West and in California in particular. Governmental agencies are interested in instituting policies which will help conserve water (reduce water application levels on a per acre basis). Some of the policies include water pricing, tax credits and/or subsidies for improving field and irrigation delivery efficiencies, reductions in available irrigation water and use of the extension service as a means of conveying water-saving techniques and technologies to farmers. The effects of the above policies on farmer profits, returns over total variable costs and quantities of water conserved are examined for three crops grown in California - corn, cotton, and processing tomatoes. The results show that there is potential for conserving water in California through implementation of governmental policies. Water pricing policies could be effective on all crops if the price changes are dramatic rather than marginal. Improvements in field and delivery efficiencies for furrow irrigated crops could conserve water and improve farmers' returns over total variable costs. Improving field efficiencies for sprinkler irrigated crops could conserve some water, but farmers returns over total variable costs are only marginally improved. Reductions in available water will clearly conserve water. The effects on farmer profits, however, vary with the type of crop, type of irrigation and location of the farm. Using the extension service to encourage farmers to irrigate at profit maximizing levels rather than at the levels currently being used could conserve water and marginally improve profits.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCorn -- Irrigation -- Economic aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCotton -- Irrigation -- Economic aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTomatoes -- Irrigation -- Economic aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIrrigation farming -- Economic aspects -- California.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Economicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAyer, Harry W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWade, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.oclc212855574en_US
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