Development and analysis of a kinematic wave approach for estimating potential water yields of microcatchment irrigation systems on natural soils

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191724
Title:
Development and analysis of a kinematic wave approach for estimating potential water yields of microcatchment irrigation systems on natural soils
Author:
Greengard, Thomas Charles.
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A conceptual and experimental analysis of rainfall-runoff hydraulics on a natural microcatchment was conducted in the Negev Desert, Israel. The kinematic wave equations were utilized as a physically-based, hydrodynamic model because they can mathematically describe the simultaneous processes of rainfall, infiltration, and runoff. Model inputs are rainfall and infiltration rates, catchment response time, and flow velocity. A series of experiments was conducted over a range of rainfall intensities using a rainfall simulator. The slope of the infiltration curve, time when runoff begins, time to peak, and peak discharge were found to be dependent on rainfall intensity. Owing to its effects on infiltration, the highest rainfall intensity did not produce the largest water yield. Velocity was found to be independent of flow depth and a linear function of rainfall intensity. The concept of constant velocity linearized the kinematic wave equation and enabled analytic solutions to be developed. These solutions are not unique; graphical fitting or multiple regression should be used to identify optimal parameter values. Model equations can be used to calculate the catchment size necessary to supply the water requirements of a given tree species and can be applied in regions where computer use is not feasible.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Runoff -- Israel -- Negev -- Mathematical models.; Rain and rainfall -- Israel -- Negev -- Simulation methods.; Kinematics.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ben-Asher, Jiftah

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and analysis of a kinematic wave approach for estimating potential water yields of microcatchment irrigation systems on natural soilsen_US
dc.creatorGreengard, Thomas Charles.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreengard, Thomas Charles.en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA conceptual and experimental analysis of rainfall-runoff hydraulics on a natural microcatchment was conducted in the Negev Desert, Israel. The kinematic wave equations were utilized as a physically-based, hydrodynamic model because they can mathematically describe the simultaneous processes of rainfall, infiltration, and runoff. Model inputs are rainfall and infiltration rates, catchment response time, and flow velocity. A series of experiments was conducted over a range of rainfall intensities using a rainfall simulator. The slope of the infiltration curve, time when runoff begins, time to peak, and peak discharge were found to be dependent on rainfall intensity. Owing to its effects on infiltration, the highest rainfall intensity did not produce the largest water yield. Velocity was found to be independent of flow depth and a linear function of rainfall intensity. The concept of constant velocity linearized the kinematic wave equation and enabled analytic solutions to be developed. These solutions are not unique; graphical fitting or multiple regression should be used to identify optimal parameter values. Model equations can be used to calculate the catchment size necessary to supply the water requirements of a given tree species and can be applied in regions where computer use is not feasible.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRunoff -- Israel -- Negev -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRain and rainfall -- Israel -- Negev -- Simulation methods.en_US
dc.subject.lcshKinematics.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBen-Asher, Jiftahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDiskin, Mordechaien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThames, John L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212905964en_US
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