Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191723
Title:
An analysis of recession flows from different vegetation types
Author:
Sulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin Bin.
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Delaying characteristics of recession flows were evaluated from Central Arizona watersheds representing mixed conifer, ponderosa pine, pinyon juniper, grassland, and chaparral vegetation cover types, with areas ranging from 15 to over 60 square miles. Basically, slopes of individual recession hydrographs were determined and used to discriminate the influence of vegetation cover types, seasons of year, soil moisture conditions and land use. Based on an analysis of 66 summer and 45 winter flow recession hydrographs it was suggested that summer flows from grassland watersheds were different in comparison with those from ponderosa pine, pinyon juniper, and mixed conifer watersheds. Specifically, slow flow recessions were less sustained for grassland watersheds as compared to mixed conifer and ponderosa pine. No differences in winter recessions were detected among the watersheds.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Stream measurements -- Arizona.; Runoff -- Arizona.; Runoff -- Mathematical models.; Watershed management -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ffolliott, Peter F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn analysis of recession flows from different vegetation typesen_US
dc.creatorSulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin Bin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin Bin.en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDelaying characteristics of recession flows were evaluated from Central Arizona watersheds representing mixed conifer, ponderosa pine, pinyon juniper, grassland, and chaparral vegetation cover types, with areas ranging from 15 to over 60 square miles. Basically, slopes of individual recession hydrographs were determined and used to discriminate the influence of vegetation cover types, seasons of year, soil moisture conditions and land use. Based on an analysis of 66 summer and 45 winter flow recession hydrographs it was suggested that summer flows from grassland watersheds were different in comparison with those from ponderosa pine, pinyon juniper, and mixed conifer watersheds. Specifically, slow flow recessions were less sustained for grassland watersheds as compared to mixed conifer and ponderosa pine. No differences in winter recessions were detected among the watersheds.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStream measurements -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRunoff -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRunoff -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatershed management -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThames, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRasmussen, William O.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212905996en_US
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