Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191688
Title:
Aerosol growth and chemical change : models for arid environments
Author:
Beyak, Richard Andrew.
Issue Date:
1979
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Atmospheric aerosols, exposed to various dispersing gases, undergo evolution of chemical composition and subsequent growth/ shrinkage. The model developed considers a multi-component aerosol particle situated within a smelter plume. The particle evolves with respect to size and composition due to the absorption of gases, both emitted and ambient. Processes to be considered in this absorption are: diffusion of gases to the particle surface, gas/liquid interfacial equilibrium, and liquid phase chemistry. The gases in the plume undergo advection, turbulent diffusion, settling, and gas-to-particle conversion, dispersing eventually into a low humidity environment. The conversion mechanism was first considered a simple first-order removal term, then considered to be a function of liquid phase chemistry. The model is applied to consider secondary sulfate formation within a copper smelter plume in an arid environment. Sulfate formation is found to occur early in the plume trajectory, where SO2 levels are highest, and is a strong function of ambient ammonia levels. Also, particles emitted into arid conditions are found to shrink to smaller, highly acidic particles in equilibrium with the dry, ambient conditions. Predictions are made of downwind gas phase pollutant levels as well as final chemical composition and particle size of the emitted aerosols.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Aerosols -- Mathematical models.; Sulfur compounds -- Environmental aspects.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Peterson, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAerosol growth and chemical change : models for arid environmentsen_US
dc.creatorBeyak, Richard Andrew.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeyak, Richard Andrew.en_US
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAtmospheric aerosols, exposed to various dispersing gases, undergo evolution of chemical composition and subsequent growth/ shrinkage. The model developed considers a multi-component aerosol particle situated within a smelter plume. The particle evolves with respect to size and composition due to the absorption of gases, both emitted and ambient. Processes to be considered in this absorption are: diffusion of gases to the particle surface, gas/liquid interfacial equilibrium, and liquid phase chemistry. The gases in the plume undergo advection, turbulent diffusion, settling, and gas-to-particle conversion, dispersing eventually into a low humidity environment. The conversion mechanism was first considered a simple first-order removal term, then considered to be a function of liquid phase chemistry. The model is applied to consider secondary sulfate formation within a copper smelter plume in an arid environment. Sulfate formation is found to occur early in the plume trajectory, where SO2 levels are highest, and is a strong function of ambient ammonia levels. Also, particles emitted into arid conditions are found to shrink to smaller, highly acidic particles in equilibrium with the dry, ambient conditions. Predictions are made of downwind gas phase pollutant levels as well as final chemical composition and particle size of the emitted aerosols.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAerosols -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSulfur compounds -- Environmental aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairPeterson, Thomas W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213274871en_US
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