Effects of film-forming antitranspirants on fish, water quality, and terrestrial insects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191684
Title:
Effects of film-forming antitranspirants on fish, water quality, and terrestrial insects
Author:
Garrett, Robert Harry.
Issue Date:
1979
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Phreatophytes in the western United States consume water at a rapid rate through transpiration and present a serious water wastage problem. Initial attempts to control wastage were through eradication by mechanical means. These methods met with little success due to high costs, regrowth abilities of phreatophytes and opposition from wildlife interests that consider phreatophyte vegetation essential wildlife habitat. Chemical antitranspirants, which would reduce phreatophyte transpiration without harming the plant, provide an alternative to eradication. However, the impact of these chemicals on the environment had not been investigated. Aerial application of an antitranspirant would introduce a pollutant into the aquatic environment, so effects of these chemicals on fish were investigated. Acute toxicity tests using mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, were performed at 20°C and 25°C using film-forming antitranspirants, Folicote and Mobileaf. Both antitranspirants were found practically non-toxic. However, during toxicity experiments, both antitranspirants demonstrated oxygen consumptive tendencies. Further tests without fish showed significant dissolved oxygen demand by Folicote. A field experiment was conducted during actual application of Mobileaf on saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) to indicate any drastic changes or effects antitranspirants may have on local insect populations. Due to an apparent impoverished insect fauna and other limiting factors, no conclusive results were obtained.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Phreatophytes.; Plants -- Transpiration.; Pollution -- Physiological effect.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kynard, Boyd E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of film-forming antitranspirants on fish, water quality, and terrestrial insectsen_US
dc.creatorGarrett, Robert Harry.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGarrett, Robert Harry.en_US
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhreatophytes in the western United States consume water at a rapid rate through transpiration and present a serious water wastage problem. Initial attempts to control wastage were through eradication by mechanical means. These methods met with little success due to high costs, regrowth abilities of phreatophytes and opposition from wildlife interests that consider phreatophyte vegetation essential wildlife habitat. Chemical antitranspirants, which would reduce phreatophyte transpiration without harming the plant, provide an alternative to eradication. However, the impact of these chemicals on the environment had not been investigated. Aerial application of an antitranspirant would introduce a pollutant into the aquatic environment, so effects of these chemicals on fish were investigated. Acute toxicity tests using mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, were performed at 20°C and 25°C using film-forming antitranspirants, Folicote and Mobileaf. Both antitranspirants were found practically non-toxic. However, during toxicity experiments, both antitranspirants demonstrated oxygen consumptive tendencies. Further tests without fish showed significant dissolved oxygen demand by Folicote. A field experiment was conducted during actual application of Mobileaf on saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) to indicate any drastic changes or effects antitranspirants may have on local insect populations. Due to an apparent impoverished insect fauna and other limiting factors, no conclusive results were obtained.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPhreatophytes.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPlants -- Transpiration.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPollution -- Physiological effect.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKynard, Boyd E.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213276217en_US
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