A utilization pattern by deer and cattle on Whitespar Watershed B in the Arizona chaparral

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191670
Title:
A utilization pattern by deer and cattle on Whitespar Watershed B in the Arizona chaparral
Author:
Hembree, Larry Alan,1946-
Issue Date:
1978
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the Arizona chaparral south of Prescott, the "browsed-class" method was first employed to estimate browse utilization by deer and cattle on two key areas within the Whitespar Experimental Watershed B. By analyzing the utilization pattern in its environmental and biological context, an attempt was made to discern its most important causes and implications. Slope position, vegetation density, and percentage slope were found to be highly significant in their effects on browse utilization. Ridge location and distance up drainage were not found to be significant though their two-way interactions among themselves and slope position were. These factors combined to create a utilization pattern that varied widely over the study area. This implied that the true deer carrying capacity of the watershed was being established far below its potential set by food. However, it was concluded that cattle and climate had a profound influence on the deer population through the browse resource, and that the utilization pattern was a product of a deer-cattle-food equilibrium. A conceptual framework was developed for use in investigating equilibrium relationships, population regulation mechanisms, and ungulate food competition from the study of utilization patterns.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Chaparral ecology -- Arizona -- Whitespar Experimental Watershed B.; Browse (Animal food); Deer -- Food -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Schmutz, Ervin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA utilization pattern by deer and cattle on Whitespar Watershed B in the Arizona chaparralen_US
dc.creatorHembree, Larry Alan,1946-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHembree, Larry Alan,1946-en_US
dc.date.issued1978en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the Arizona chaparral south of Prescott, the "browsed-class" method was first employed to estimate browse utilization by deer and cattle on two key areas within the Whitespar Experimental Watershed B. By analyzing the utilization pattern in its environmental and biological context, an attempt was made to discern its most important causes and implications. Slope position, vegetation density, and percentage slope were found to be highly significant in their effects on browse utilization. Ridge location and distance up drainage were not found to be significant though their two-way interactions among themselves and slope position were. These factors combined to create a utilization pattern that varied widely over the study area. This implied that the true deer carrying capacity of the watershed was being established far below its potential set by food. However, it was concluded that cattle and climate had a profound influence on the deer population through the browse resource, and that the utilization pattern was a product of a deer-cattle-food equilibrium. A conceptual framework was developed for use in investigating equilibrium relationships, population regulation mechanisms, and ungulate food competition from the study of utilization patterns.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChaparral ecology -- Arizona -- Whitespar Experimental Watershed B.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBrowse (Animal food)en_US
dc.subject.lcshDeer -- Food -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchmutz, Ervin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOgden, Phil R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHungerford, C. Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, William W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212761706en_US
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