Deterministic watershed model for evaluating the effects of surface mining on hydrology

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191668
Title:
Deterministic watershed model for evaluating the effects of surface mining on hydrology
Author:
Berkas, Wayne R.
Issue Date:
1978
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Natural hydrologic factors help limit the extent to which land disturbed by man's activities, such as surface mining, can be returned to a productive state. In the western United States the available moisture is frequently the most important factor. This factor causes soil moisture to be low and ground water contributions to runoff to be miniscule. A deterministic watershed model is developed by which estimates of soil moisture, peak flows, runoff volumes and erosion can be obtained. With this information, decisions regarding recontouring and revegetation can be made with greater confidence. The watershed model is designed to readily accept changes in topography, which allows proposed surface configurations to be evaluated without physically recontouring. The model is composed of five components: evapotranspiration, interception, soil moisture movement (infiltration and evaporation), surface runoff routing, and sedimentation. On a 2.2 ha watershed on Black Mesa, Arizona, actual infiltration and runoff rates were compared to simulated infiltration and runoff rates. The results were very good.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Mineral industries -- Environmental aspects -- Southwest, New.; Strip mining -- Environmental aspects -- Southwest, New.; Moisture -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County); Watersheds -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County) -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fogel, Martin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDeterministic watershed model for evaluating the effects of surface mining on hydrologyen_US
dc.creatorBerkas, Wayne R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBerkas, Wayne R.en_US
dc.date.issued1978en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNatural hydrologic factors help limit the extent to which land disturbed by man's activities, such as surface mining, can be returned to a productive state. In the western United States the available moisture is frequently the most important factor. This factor causes soil moisture to be low and ground water contributions to runoff to be miniscule. A deterministic watershed model is developed by which estimates of soil moisture, peak flows, runoff volumes and erosion can be obtained. With this information, decisions regarding recontouring and revegetation can be made with greater confidence. The watershed model is designed to readily accept changes in topography, which allows proposed surface configurations to be evaluated without physically recontouring. The model is composed of five components: evapotranspiration, interception, soil moisture movement (infiltration and evaporation), surface runoff routing, and sedimentation. On a 2.2 ha watershed on Black Mesa, Arizona, actual infiltration and runoff rates were compared to simulated infiltration and runoff rates. The results were very good.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMineral industries -- Environmental aspects -- Southwest, New.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStrip mining -- Environmental aspects -- Southwest, New.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMoisture -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County)en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatersheds -- Arizona -- Black Mesa (Navajo County and Apache County) -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc4305883en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.