Effect of illuviated deposits on inflitration rates and denitrification during sewage effluent recharge

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191648
Title:
Effect of illuviated deposits on inflitration rates and denitrification during sewage effluent recharge
Author:
Herbert, Richard A.
Issue Date:
1976
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A column study was conducted to determine the interrelationships among nitrogen transformations, infiltration rates, and development of a black layer during sewage effluent recharge. Columns were packed with river sand and continuously flooded with sewage effluent for 28 days during the first trial, designated run 1. Run 2 lasted for 64 days and gravel was used in place of sand. For both runs infiltration rates and manometer readings were recorded daily and samples of the inflow and outflow were collected and analyzed for the various nitrogen compounds. Infiltration rates decreased rapidly upon application of the sewage, mainly due to clogging of the surface by suspended solids. A black layer developed within a few days, the thickness of which was inversely related to the infiltration rate. There was an average reduction in total nitrogen of 62.9% during run 1 and 15.9% during run 2. Black layer development was not a cause of reduced infiltration rates, but lower infiltration rates appeared to be an indirect cause of a thicker black layer within a given soil type. Total nitrogen reduction was apparently not related to black layer development. However, the percent of total nitrogen removal was greater for lower infiltration rates.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Sewage -- Purification.; Sewage -- Environmental aspects.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Wilson, L. G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of illuviated deposits on inflitration rates and denitrification during sewage effluent rechargeen_US
dc.creatorHerbert, Richard A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHerbert, Richard A.en_US
dc.date.issued1976en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA column study was conducted to determine the interrelationships among nitrogen transformations, infiltration rates, and development of a black layer during sewage effluent recharge. Columns were packed with river sand and continuously flooded with sewage effluent for 28 days during the first trial, designated run 1. Run 2 lasted for 64 days and gravel was used in place of sand. For both runs infiltration rates and manometer readings were recorded daily and samples of the inflow and outflow were collected and analyzed for the various nitrogen compounds. Infiltration rates decreased rapidly upon application of the sewage, mainly due to clogging of the surface by suspended solids. A black layer developed within a few days, the thickness of which was inversely related to the infiltration rate. There was an average reduction in total nitrogen of 62.9% during run 1 and 15.9% during run 2. Black layer development was not a cause of reduced infiltration rates, but lower infiltration rates appeared to be an indirect cause of a thicker black layer within a given soil type. Total nitrogen reduction was apparently not related to black layer development. However, the percent of total nitrogen removal was greater for lower infiltration rates.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSewage -- Purification.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSewage -- Environmental aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWilson, L. G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZwolinski, M. J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLehman, G. S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFfolliott, P. F.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212770174en_US
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