Hydrologic modeling to determine the effect of small earthen reservoirs on ephemeral streamflow

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191642
Title:
Hydrologic modeling to determine the effect of small earthen reservoirs on ephemeral streamflow
Author:
Lovely, Collis Joe,1944-
Issue Date:
1976
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Due to the concern of downstream water users, the effect of a large number of small stock water reservoirs on streamflow in North- Central Arizona was studied. The U. S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service's hydrologic watershed model -- USDAHL-74 Revised Model of Watershed Hydrology, developed by H. R. Holtan, N. C. Lopez, and others -- was used. The 49 square mile study watershed, Red Tank Draw, on the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed, contains 27 small earthen reservoirs with a total storage capacity of 124 acre-feet which control runoff from 32 percent of the watershed. Average annual runoff for 14 years of record totals 4,192 acre-feet, with a range from 32 to 13,420 acre-feet. Approximately two-thirds (or 2,994 acre-feet) of the total occurs in the winter and spring runoff seasons. Results indicate that during the winter and spring, when the majority of runoff occurs, streamflow at the mouth of the watershed was reduced 2.6 to 10.7 percent for the four years studied. These results are consistent with the results of previous research on other watersheds in which reductions in streamflow due to small reservoirs ranged from 2 to 33 percent. The watershed model, as used in this study, was unable to adequately simulate runoff in low water yield years and during the summer runoff season. The model worked well in simulating the winter and spring runoff periods. Based on the findings of other studies, it did a reasonably good job in evaluating the effects of the reservoirs on streamflow.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Ephemeral streams -- Arizona.; Stream measurements -- Arizona.; Hydrologic models.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Cluff, C. Brent

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHydrologic modeling to determine the effect of small earthen reservoirs on ephemeral streamflowen_US
dc.creatorLovely, Collis Joe,1944-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLovely, Collis Joe,1944-en_US
dc.date.issued1976en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDue to the concern of downstream water users, the effect of a large number of small stock water reservoirs on streamflow in North- Central Arizona was studied. The U. S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service's hydrologic watershed model -- USDAHL-74 Revised Model of Watershed Hydrology, developed by H. R. Holtan, N. C. Lopez, and others -- was used. The 49 square mile study watershed, Red Tank Draw, on the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed, contains 27 small earthen reservoirs with a total storage capacity of 124 acre-feet which control runoff from 32 percent of the watershed. Average annual runoff for 14 years of record totals 4,192 acre-feet, with a range from 32 to 13,420 acre-feet. Approximately two-thirds (or 2,994 acre-feet) of the total occurs in the winter and spring runoff seasons. Results indicate that during the winter and spring, when the majority of runoff occurs, streamflow at the mouth of the watershed was reduced 2.6 to 10.7 percent for the four years studied. These results are consistent with the results of previous research on other watersheds in which reductions in streamflow due to small reservoirs ranged from 2 to 33 percent. The watershed model, as used in this study, was unable to adequately simulate runoff in low water yield years and during the summer runoff season. The model worked well in simulating the winter and spring runoff periods. Based on the findings of other studies, it did a reasonably good job in evaluating the effects of the reservoirs on streamflow.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEphemeral streams -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStream measurements -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrologic models.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairCluff, C. Brenten_US
dc.identifier.oclc212758534en_US
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