Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191621
Title:
Sulphuric acid for reducing sodium hazard of irrigation water.
Author:
Guma, Guma Sayed.
Issue Date:
1975
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effect of sulfuric acid applied to irrigation water on sodium adsorption ratio, exchangeable sodium percentage, and saturated hydraulic conductivity was studied by one greenhouse and two laboratory experiments using five soil samples and five different waters mixed to simulate those used for irrigation in the Southwestern United States. Application of sulfuric acid to the irrigation water decreased the sodium adsorption ratio and the exchangeable sodium percentage. Conventional equations based on the pile parameter over-estimate the effect of bicarbonates on the sodium adsorption ratio, while the equation based on carbonate equilibrium gave a more realistic estimate. The measured exchangeable sodium percentage was found to be proportional to the calculated sodium adsorption ratio. The proportionality constant for the five soils studied was 0.76 divided by the square root of the leaching fraction. Acid application also increased the rate of water movement when sodium adsorption ratio was greater than 7.0 in some soils without lowering the pH to acidic ranges.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Irrigation water.; Sulfuric acid.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soils, Water and Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Warrick, Arthur W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSulphuric acid for reducing sodium hazard of irrigation water.en_US
dc.creatorGuma, Guma Sayed.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuma, Guma Sayed.en_US
dc.date.issued1975en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effect of sulfuric acid applied to irrigation water on sodium adsorption ratio, exchangeable sodium percentage, and saturated hydraulic conductivity was studied by one greenhouse and two laboratory experiments using five soil samples and five different waters mixed to simulate those used for irrigation in the Southwestern United States. Application of sulfuric acid to the irrigation water decreased the sodium adsorption ratio and the exchangeable sodium percentage. Conventional equations based on the pile parameter over-estimate the effect of bicarbonates on the sodium adsorption ratio, while the equation based on carbonate equilibrium gave a more realistic estimate. The measured exchangeable sodium percentage was found to be proportional to the calculated sodium adsorption ratio. The proportionality constant for the five soils studied was 0.76 divided by the square root of the leaching fraction. Acid application also increased the rate of water movement when sodium adsorption ratio was greater than 7.0 in some soils without lowering the pH to acidic ranges.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIrrigation water.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSulfuric acid.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoils, Water and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWarrick, Arthur W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212906589en_US
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