Hydrogeology and water resources of Middle Kirkland Creek basin, Yavapai county, Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191604
Title:
Hydrogeology and water resources of Middle Kirkland Creek basin, Yavapai county, Arizona.
Author:
Randall, Jeffrey Hunt.
Issue Date:
1974
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Middle Kirkland Creek basin lies at the northern edge of the Basin and Range province 20 miles southwest of Prescott, Arizona. The hydrogeologic system of the basin includes two major aquifers: alluvial sediments and basaltic volcanics. The alluvial sediments are a series of granitic pebble conglomerates intercalated with basalt flows in some areas overlaid by finegrained lacustrine sediments that grade laterally into a pebble conglomerate. Overlying these units is a thin narrow deposit of unconsolidated sands, gravels, and silts representing the flood-plain alluvium of Kirkland Creek. The estimated transmissitivities of the alluvial sediments are as follows: Lower Kirkland Valley - 75,000 to 100,000 gpd/ft Thompsons Valley - 30,000 to 60 , 000 gpd/ft Well yields in Lower Kirkland Valley range from 500 to 1200 gpm and those from Thompsons Valley 200 to 500 gpm. The decreased yields in Thompsons Valley result from the finer texture of the flood-plain alluvium in this area. The basalt aquifer consists of a series of more than 1000 feet of fractured basalt flows interbedded with cinder and conglomeratic layers. The transmissivity of this unit is estimated to range from 50,000 to 200,000 gpd/ft. Wells drilled in this unit could yield 200 to 1000 gpm depending on the nature of the fracturing.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Hydrogeology -- Arizona -- Yavapai County.; Water resources development -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harshbarger, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHydrogeology and water resources of Middle Kirkland Creek basin, Yavapai county, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorRandall, Jeffrey Hunt.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRandall, Jeffrey Hunt.en_US
dc.date.issued1974en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMiddle Kirkland Creek basin lies at the northern edge of the Basin and Range province 20 miles southwest of Prescott, Arizona. The hydrogeologic system of the basin includes two major aquifers: alluvial sediments and basaltic volcanics. The alluvial sediments are a series of granitic pebble conglomerates intercalated with basalt flows in some areas overlaid by finegrained lacustrine sediments that grade laterally into a pebble conglomerate. Overlying these units is a thin narrow deposit of unconsolidated sands, gravels, and silts representing the flood-plain alluvium of Kirkland Creek. The estimated transmissitivities of the alluvial sediments are as follows: Lower Kirkland Valley - 75,000 to 100,000 gpd/ft Thompsons Valley - 30,000 to 60 , 000 gpd/ft Well yields in Lower Kirkland Valley range from 500 to 1200 gpm and those from Thompsons Valley 200 to 500 gpm. The decreased yields in Thompsons Valley result from the finer texture of the flood-plain alluvium in this area. The basalt aquifer consists of a series of more than 1000 feet of fractured basalt flows interbedded with cinder and conglomeratic layers. The transmissivity of this unit is estimated to range from 50,000 to 200,000 gpd/ft. Wells drilled in this unit could yield 200 to 1000 gpm depending on the nature of the fracturing.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrogeology -- Arizona -- Yavapai County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarshbarger, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Grayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeCook, Jimen_US
dc.identifier.oclc212829325en_US
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