Impact of nitrate fertilizer restrictions on Salt River Project and Roosevelt Water Conservation District growers.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191600
Title:
Impact of nitrate fertilizer restrictions on Salt River Project and Roosevelt Water Conservation District growers.
Author:
Schoneman, David Frederick,1947-
Issue Date:
1974
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Environmental pollution has become one of the most important of society's problems and the extent of this problem continues to grow every day. Society, through an extreme concern for pollution, is beginning to construct policies, laws, and institutions to deal with this problem. Unfortunately, in many cases, laws are being enacted, policies developed, and institutions built or modified to combat pollution without full knowledge of the parameters of the system upon which they must operate. Several types of regulatory programs may be imposed by government to control farm pollution. For example, regulations may take the form of restrictions upon inputs used in production, land use, and waste disposal practices. All of these controls have potentially significant effects upon farm operation and costs of production. An important aspect of this problem is the probable economic impact of such restrictions upon the agricultural industry and upon individual producers. This study investigates the economic impact of nitrate fertilizer restrictions on Arizona's Salt River Project and Roosevelt Water Conservation District growers. A procedure to identify this impact, incorporating production functions and a linear programming formulation was utilized. The integrated model is described, the results for the irrigation districts are presented, and tentative implications drawn. Limitations of the study and additional research possibilities are also outlined.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Nitrates.; Fertilizers -- Law and legislation -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Agricultural Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Willett, Gayle S.; Day, John C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImpact of nitrate fertilizer restrictions on Salt River Project and Roosevelt Water Conservation District growers.en_US
dc.creatorSchoneman, David Frederick,1947-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchoneman, David Frederick,1947-en_US
dc.date.issued1974en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental pollution has become one of the most important of society's problems and the extent of this problem continues to grow every day. Society, through an extreme concern for pollution, is beginning to construct policies, laws, and institutions to deal with this problem. Unfortunately, in many cases, laws are being enacted, policies developed, and institutions built or modified to combat pollution without full knowledge of the parameters of the system upon which they must operate. Several types of regulatory programs may be imposed by government to control farm pollution. For example, regulations may take the form of restrictions upon inputs used in production, land use, and waste disposal practices. All of these controls have potentially significant effects upon farm operation and costs of production. An important aspect of this problem is the probable economic impact of such restrictions upon the agricultural industry and upon individual producers. This study investigates the economic impact of nitrate fertilizer restrictions on Arizona's Salt River Project and Roosevelt Water Conservation District growers. A procedure to identify this impact, incorporating production functions and a linear programming formulation was utilized. The integrated model is described, the results for the irrigation districts are presented, and tentative implications drawn. Limitations of the study and additional research possibilities are also outlined.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNitrates.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFertilizers -- Law and legislation -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Economicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWillett, Gayle S.en_US
dc.contributor.chairDay, John C.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213386730en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.