Effect of mixed-grass cover and native-soil filter on urban runoff quality.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191582
Title:
Effect of mixed-grass cover and native-soil filter on urban runoff quality.
Author:
Popkin, Barney P.
Issue Date:
1973
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A grass-covered soil filter of native calcareous loam, 200-feet long, 4-feet wide and 5-feet deep, was tested for effectiveness as a water-quality treatment for Tucson urban storm runoff. Water was pumped from Arcadia Wash and applied to the filter in four trials in Fall 1971. Inflow and outflow volumes were measured, sampled and analyzed for important water-quality variables. For grass and grass-soil filtration respectively, the following maximum percent reductions, compared to untreated runoff, occurred: For chemical oxygen demand (COD), 19 and 88; for suspended solids, 34 and 99.6; for volatile suspended solids, 26 and 97; for turbidity, 97 and 98; for total coliforms, 84 and 98; and for fecal coliforms, 50 and 98. Grass-soil filtration, during the four trials, produced water too saline for most uses. After the initial stabilization period, grass-soil filtration was more effective than grass filtration in water-quality improvement. Grass soil filtration had, with time, increasing COD and salt concentrations in the early part of each trial, and decreasing infiltration rates. Grass maturity and soil compaction, following construction of the filter, initially increased efficiency of the water-quality improvement process. Grass filtration upgraded cool-season urban runoff for recreation, irrigation, artificial groundwater recharge, fisheries and wildlife, except in the initial part of some trials and in the grass establishment period when COD, volatile suspended solids and coliforms increased. Chlorination of treated runoff is necessary, particularly for warm-season flows, when recreational water use is anticipated.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Urban runoff -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Urban hydrology -- Arizona -- Tucson.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Resnick, Sol Donald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of mixed-grass cover and native-soil filter on urban runoff quality.en_US
dc.creatorPopkin, Barney P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPopkin, Barney P.en_US
dc.date.issued1973en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA grass-covered soil filter of native calcareous loam, 200-feet long, 4-feet wide and 5-feet deep, was tested for effectiveness as a water-quality treatment for Tucson urban storm runoff. Water was pumped from Arcadia Wash and applied to the filter in four trials in Fall 1971. Inflow and outflow volumes were measured, sampled and analyzed for important water-quality variables. For grass and grass-soil filtration respectively, the following maximum percent reductions, compared to untreated runoff, occurred: For chemical oxygen demand (COD), 19 and 88; for suspended solids, 34 and 99.6; for volatile suspended solids, 26 and 97; for turbidity, 97 and 98; for total coliforms, 84 and 98; and for fecal coliforms, 50 and 98. Grass-soil filtration, during the four trials, produced water too saline for most uses. After the initial stabilization period, grass-soil filtration was more effective than grass filtration in water-quality improvement. Grass soil filtration had, with time, increasing COD and salt concentrations in the early part of each trial, and decreasing infiltration rates. Grass maturity and soil compaction, following construction of the filter, initially increased efficiency of the water-quality improvement process. Grass filtration upgraded cool-season urban runoff for recreation, irrigation, artificial groundwater recharge, fisheries and wildlife, except in the initial part of some trials and in the grass establishment period when COD, volatile suspended solids and coliforms increased. Chlorination of treated runoff is necessary, particularly for warm-season flows, when recreational water use is anticipated.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUrban runoff -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUrban hydrology -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairResnick, Sol Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhillips, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213396463en_US
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