An economic analysis of chaparral conversion on national forest lands in the Salt-Verde Basin, Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191573
Title:
An economic analysis of chaparral conversion on national forest lands in the Salt-Verde Basin, Arizona.
Author:
Brown, Thomas C.(Thomas Capnor),1945-
Issue Date:
1973
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Manipulation of dense chaparral vegetation has received considerable study in Arizona recently due to interest in increasing the water supply for the Phoenix area. Studies have shown that runoff can be significantly increased following conversion of dense chaparral to grass. Conversion also increases forage for livestock and reduces firefighting costs. In addition, conversion may have a favorable effect on recreational opportunities, esthetics, and wildlife habitat. There are roughly 850,000 acres of chaparral on National Forest land in the Salt-Verde Basin, 42 percent (353,989 acres) of which meet certain physical and managerial criteria for conversion. Found on the Tonto, Prescott, and Coconino National Forests, this acreage can be represented as 141 separate chaparral areas. A benefit-cost analysis of the 141 chaparral areas, comparing water, forage, add firefighting benefits with conversion and maintenance costs for a 50-year period, shows that conversion is economically feasible on 67 percent of the areas at a seven percent discount rate. Since only from 20 to 60 percent of each area is actually treatable, a total of 147,155 acres are economically feasible for treatment.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Watershed management -- Arizona.; Chaparral ecology -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
O'Connell, Paul F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn economic analysis of chaparral conversion on national forest lands in the Salt-Verde Basin, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorBrown, Thomas C.(Thomas Capnor),1945-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Thomas C.(Thomas Capnor),1945-en_US
dc.date.issued1973en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractManipulation of dense chaparral vegetation has received considerable study in Arizona recently due to interest in increasing the water supply for the Phoenix area. Studies have shown that runoff can be significantly increased following conversion of dense chaparral to grass. Conversion also increases forage for livestock and reduces firefighting costs. In addition, conversion may have a favorable effect on recreational opportunities, esthetics, and wildlife habitat. There are roughly 850,000 acres of chaparral on National Forest land in the Salt-Verde Basin, 42 percent (353,989 acres) of which meet certain physical and managerial criteria for conversion. Found on the Tonto, Prescott, and Coconino National Forests, this acreage can be represented as 141 separate chaparral areas. A benefit-cost analysis of the 141 chaparral areas, comparing water, forage, add firefighting benefits with conversion and maintenance costs for a 50-year period, shows that conversion is economically feasible on 67 percent of the areas at a seven percent discount rate. Since only from 20 to 60 percent of each area is actually treatable, a total of 147,155 acres are economically feasible for treatment.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatershed management -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChaparral ecology -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairO'Connell, Paul F.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212738232en_US
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