Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191566
Title:
Analysis of water resources in Safford, Arizona.
Author:
Wahab, Nasar Almad,1937-
Issue Date:
1972
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Safford Valley, Arizona obtains irrigation water from a combination of surface water and ground water. Sometimes during the summer both surface and ground water are not enough for crop demands. Ground water is very high in dissolved solids. Every year approximately 200,000 tons of dissolved solids are deposited on the crop lands in the irrigation water. The total annual irrigation water requirement in the valley, as estimated by the Blaney-Criddle method, is 241,000 acre-feet. Diverted water plus pumpage is 210,000 acre-ft. per year. Total net annual water use in the valley, as estimated by a water budget equation, is 107,000 acre-ft. Diverted plus pumped water less the net volume of water • represents water lost to seepage from the valley. Historical data records were used to generate data by a lag-one Markov process using statistical parameters from five different periods. The generated data were then used to estimate storage capacity of a proposed reservoir by flow-mass curve analysis. The 100-year flood was estimated by flood frquency analysis using three different frequency distributions. The extreme flood, as plotted on Gumbel, arithmetic and log-normal probability paper was found to be 78,000, 75,000 and 126,000 cubic feet per second (cfs), respectively. Three water management alternatives were suggested for the purpose of improving water use in the basin. The alternative that was more efficient in irrigation practices was recommended.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Water-supply -- Arizona -- Graham County.; Water-supply, Agricultural -- Arizona -- Graham County.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fogel, Martin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of water resources in Safford, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorWahab, Nasar Almad,1937-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWahab, Nasar Almad,1937-en_US
dc.date.issued1972en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSafford Valley, Arizona obtains irrigation water from a combination of surface water and ground water. Sometimes during the summer both surface and ground water are not enough for crop demands. Ground water is very high in dissolved solids. Every year approximately 200,000 tons of dissolved solids are deposited on the crop lands in the irrigation water. The total annual irrigation water requirement in the valley, as estimated by the Blaney-Criddle method, is 241,000 acre-feet. Diverted water plus pumpage is 210,000 acre-ft. per year. Total net annual water use in the valley, as estimated by a water budget equation, is 107,000 acre-ft. Diverted plus pumped water less the net volume of water • represents water lost to seepage from the valley. Historical data records were used to generate data by a lag-one Markov process using statistical parameters from five different periods. The generated data were then used to estimate storage capacity of a proposed reservoir by flow-mass curve analysis. The 100-year flood was estimated by flood frquency analysis using three different frequency distributions. The extreme flood, as plotted on Gumbel, arithmetic and log-normal probability paper was found to be 78,000, 75,000 and 126,000 cubic feet per second (cfs), respectively. Three water management alternatives were suggested for the purpose of improving water use in the basin. The alternative that was more efficient in irrigation practices was recommended.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply -- Arizona -- Graham County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply, Agricultural -- Arizona -- Graham County.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212908359en_US
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