Treatments of wastewater concentrates to remove bacteria prior to testing for viruses.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191553
Title:
Treatments of wastewater concentrates to remove bacteria prior to testing for viruses.
Author:
Riggin, Rosella Tewell,1920-
Issue Date:
1971
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Indigenous viruses from sewage specimens were freed of bacterial contamination by filtration through 25 mm, 0.45 μ Gelman membranes after the specimens had been concentrated by the Al(OH) 3 technique. This method gave the highest yields of virus isolates in HAM monolayers and yet was the simplest, most economical, and time saving of the methods tested. In addition inocula prepared this way showed no toxicity to tissue culture systems and were always free of microbial contaminants. While an average of 1642 infectious virus particles were isolated from five raw sewage specimens treated this way, only 1423 infective virus particles were isolated when the concentrated material was centrifuged at 27, 000 x G before filtration. Only 222 were isolated when the sewage concentrates were treated with centrifugation and high concentrations of antibiotics. The monolayer agar-overlay technique proved to be better than the cell suspension agar method for the plaguing of prototype strains of enteric viruses. Cell types, containers, and other conditions were varied in an effort to find the best conditions for the formation of plaques by these viruses. Monolayers of Wi38 cells gave plaques with laboratory strains of both polio and echo viruses and for this reason were chosen for testing the original virus concentrates for plaguing
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Virology -- Research.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Microbiology and Medical Technology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ludovici, P. P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTreatments of wastewater concentrates to remove bacteria prior to testing for viruses.en_US
dc.creatorRiggin, Rosella Tewell,1920-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRiggin, Rosella Tewell,1920-en_US
dc.date.issued1971en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIndigenous viruses from sewage specimens were freed of bacterial contamination by filtration through 25 mm, 0.45 μ Gelman membranes after the specimens had been concentrated by the Al(OH) 3 technique. This method gave the highest yields of virus isolates in HAM monolayers and yet was the simplest, most economical, and time saving of the methods tested. In addition inocula prepared this way showed no toxicity to tissue culture systems and were always free of microbial contaminants. While an average of 1642 infectious virus particles were isolated from five raw sewage specimens treated this way, only 1423 infective virus particles were isolated when the concentrated material was centrifuged at 27, 000 x G before filtration. Only 222 were isolated when the sewage concentrates were treated with centrifugation and high concentrations of antibiotics. The monolayer agar-overlay technique proved to be better than the cell suspension agar method for the plaguing of prototype strains of enteric viruses. Cell types, containers, and other conditions were varied in an effort to find the best conditions for the formation of plaques by these viruses. Monolayers of Wi38 cells gave plaques with laboratory strains of both polio and echo viruses and for this reason were chosen for testing the original virus concentrates for plaguingen_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshVirology -- Research.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Medical Technologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLudovici, P. P.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213297863en_US
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