Projections of farmer response to a falling groundwater table : a marriage of economic and hydrological models.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191536
Title:
Projections of farmer response to a falling groundwater table : a marriage of economic and hydrological models.
Author:
Burdak, Thomas George,1945-
Issue Date:
1970
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The groundwater problems of central Arizona are illustrative of most of the important groundwater management problems encountered in other arid regions. Large-scale pumpage of underground water for crop irrigation was followed by a rapid decline in the underground water level. Public concern was expressed as to the future of agriculture and other water-using industries in the fact of the falling water table and thus the increasing water costs. Various short- and long-run remedies have been proposed for resolving these problems, including large-scale interbasin water transfers, pumpage limitations, pumpage taxes, and continuation of the present policies without new regulation or augmentation. In order to provide objective criteria for selecting between alternative public policies, it is necessary to project the consequences of each. To do so requires that the interactions through time between the water using sectors of the economy and the physical state of the aquifer be estimated. For this purpose a procedure incorporating dynamic properties into both formal economic and hydrologic models was devised. Previous empirical projections of either hydrologic or economic activity have taken the other activity as largely given. The integrated model is described, the empirical results of 50 year projections for a case study of Pinal County are presented, the results are compared to an earlier study of the same area which used a less sophisticated procedure, and tentative policy implications are drawn.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater -- Mathematical models.; Water resources development -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Agricultural Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Martin, William E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleProjections of farmer response to a falling groundwater table : a marriage of economic and hydrological models.en_US
dc.creatorBurdak, Thomas George,1945-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurdak, Thomas George,1945-en_US
dc.date.issued1970en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe groundwater problems of central Arizona are illustrative of most of the important groundwater management problems encountered in other arid regions. Large-scale pumpage of underground water for crop irrigation was followed by a rapid decline in the underground water level. Public concern was expressed as to the future of agriculture and other water-using industries in the fact of the falling water table and thus the increasing water costs. Various short- and long-run remedies have been proposed for resolving these problems, including large-scale interbasin water transfers, pumpage limitations, pumpage taxes, and continuation of the present policies without new regulation or augmentation. In order to provide objective criteria for selecting between alternative public policies, it is necessary to project the consequences of each. To do so requires that the interactions through time between the water using sectors of the economy and the physical state of the aquifer be estimated. For this purpose a procedure incorporating dynamic properties into both formal economic and hydrologic models was devised. Previous empirical projections of either hydrologic or economic activity have taken the other activity as largely given. The integrated model is described, the empirical results of 50 year projections for a case study of Pinal County are presented, the results are compared to an earlier study of the same area which used a less sophisticated procedure, and tentative policy implications are drawn.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Economicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMartin, William E.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213415860en_US
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