Variations and geologic significance of water quality in the Judith River Formation, north-central Montana

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191530
Title:
Variations and geologic significance of water quality in the Judith River Formation, north-central Montana
Author:
Osterkamp, W. R.
Issue Date:
1970
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data are analyzed to explain water-quality anomalies in a large artesian basin. Geologic formations include the Judith River Formation, a sandstone and shale aquifer, and thick marine shales which confine the aquifer above and below. The structural feature causing artesian conditions is the Blood Creek syncline; the smaller Veasth syncline is also of major hydrologic importance. Potentiometric data show that water flows upward and eastward through the aquifer. Water quality in the aquifer does not vary as expected by consideration of basic water-quality controls. Sodium is the predominant cation; bicarbonate is generally the predominant anion, but locally high concentrations of total dissolved solids and sulfate occur. Nitrate and fluoride concentrations are relatively high; chloride content is low, indicating the aquifer has been flushed since deposition. Hydrochemical processes of major importance include shale-membrane filtration and base exchange of sodium for calcium. Shale-membrane filtration is effective except at or near axes of folds, where calcium sulfate is selectively passed to the aquifer. Breakdown of the filter locally occurs because of minute fracturing or disruption of clay particles at zones of maximum warping. Carbonate cementation is occurring at most places in the aquifer.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Water quality -- Montana -- Judith River Watershed.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Wright, Jerome J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleVariations and geologic significance of water quality in the Judith River Formation, north-central Montanaen_US
dc.creatorOsterkamp, W. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOsterkamp, W. R.en_US
dc.date.issued1970en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGeologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data are analyzed to explain water-quality anomalies in a large artesian basin. Geologic formations include the Judith River Formation, a sandstone and shale aquifer, and thick marine shales which confine the aquifer above and below. The structural feature causing artesian conditions is the Blood Creek syncline; the smaller Veasth syncline is also of major hydrologic importance. Potentiometric data show that water flows upward and eastward through the aquifer. Water quality in the aquifer does not vary as expected by consideration of basic water-quality controls. Sodium is the predominant cation; bicarbonate is generally the predominant anion, but locally high concentrations of total dissolved solids and sulfate occur. Nitrate and fluoride concentrations are relatively high; chloride content is low, indicating the aquifer has been flushed since deposition. Hydrochemical processes of major importance include shale-membrane filtration and base exchange of sodium for calcium. Shale-membrane filtration is effective except at or near axes of folds, where calcium sulfate is selectively passed to the aquifer. Breakdown of the filter locally occurs because of minute fracturing or disruption of clay particles at zones of maximum warping. Carbonate cementation is occurring at most places in the aquifer.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater quality -- Montana -- Judith River Watershed.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWright, Jerome J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSumner, John S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc227011928en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.