Effect of clays and sodium chloride on the infiltration of water in sandy soils.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191527
Title:
Effect of clays and sodium chloride on the infiltration of water in sandy soils.
Author:
Khattak, Jehangir Khan,1937-
Issue Date:
1969
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Calcium bentonite, calcium kaolinite, and calcium illite each were mixed with salt-free sand in the ratio of 1:9 in order to make artificial sandy soils. These soils were then treated with sodium chloride so that they contained 8, 15, and 30 percent exchangeable sodium, and then subjected to artificial rain. It was observed that the runoff was increased in the following order with these soils: bentonitic soil> kaolinitic soil> illitic soil. Runoff from the bentonitic soil was increased from zero in the untreated soil to 43.0, 55.6, and 111.3 percent when the exchangeable sodium percentages were 8, 15, and 30 percent, respectively. Similarly, runoff is increased from zero to 41.6, 201.0 and 214.0 in the kaolinitic soil and from zero to 72.3, 131.5, and 143.4 in the illitic soil when the exchangeable sodium percentage is changed from untreated soil to 8, 15, and 30 percent, respectively. The experimental values for exchangeable sodium percentage were lower than the theoretical values, due to increased moisture content and erosion of soil. It was concluded from this investigation that if the artificial soils used in this work contained from 8 to 15 percent exchangeable sodium, maximum runoff would be achieved, without producing any harmful effect to the soil. The quality of the runoff water would be satisfactory for irrigation purposes.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Seepage.; Sandy soils.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Agricultural Chemistry and Soils; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Dutt, Gordon R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of clays and sodium chloride on the infiltration of water in sandy soils.en_US
dc.creatorKhattak, Jehangir Khan,1937-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKhattak, Jehangir Khan,1937-en_US
dc.date.issued1969en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCalcium bentonite, calcium kaolinite, and calcium illite each were mixed with salt-free sand in the ratio of 1:9 in order to make artificial sandy soils. These soils were then treated with sodium chloride so that they contained 8, 15, and 30 percent exchangeable sodium, and then subjected to artificial rain. It was observed that the runoff was increased in the following order with these soils: bentonitic soil> kaolinitic soil> illitic soil. Runoff from the bentonitic soil was increased from zero in the untreated soil to 43.0, 55.6, and 111.3 percent when the exchangeable sodium percentages were 8, 15, and 30 percent, respectively. Similarly, runoff is increased from zero to 41.6, 201.0 and 214.0 in the kaolinitic soil and from zero to 72.3, 131.5, and 143.4 in the illitic soil when the exchangeable sodium percentage is changed from untreated soil to 8, 15, and 30 percent, respectively. The experimental values for exchangeable sodium percentage were lower than the theoretical values, due to increased moisture content and erosion of soil. It was concluded from this investigation that if the artificial soils used in this work contained from 8 to 15 percent exchangeable sodium, maximum runoff would be achieved, without producing any harmful effect to the soil. The quality of the runoff water would be satisfactory for irrigation purposes.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSeepage.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSandy soils.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Chemistry and Soilsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDutt, Gordon R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuller, Wallace H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPost, Donald F.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213413284en_US
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