The influence of sodium chloride and gravel treatments on infiltration.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191525
Title:
The influence of sodium chloride and gravel treatments on infiltration.
Author:
Powers, William Riley,1943-
Issue Date:
1969
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
During the summer of 1967, two experimental sites (Atterbury and Santa Rita) were fenced, and 12 runoff plots were installed at each site. A modified Purdue Sprinkling infiltrometer was used to determine the infiltration capacities of all plots. After calibration, four treatments were applied, and the infiltration capacities were determined for treatment effects. Each of four treatments (control, sodium chloride, gravel mulch, and a sodium chloride and gravel mulch) were replicated three times. Runoff from natural rainfall events was recorded for correlation with infiltration events. Analyses of variance and covariance analyses were utilized to evaluate treatment effects upon infiltration. For the system used, no significant treatment effects upon infiltration capacities were found. All plots showed an increase in infiltration capacity after treatment. A decrease in bulk density caused by insect activity and latent root growth of spring annuals might be the cause for increased infiltration capacities. The drop size classification of the simulated rainfall showed that 8l.67 of the drops were less than 1.167 irnu. With this drop size, soil disturbance could be minimal, and the effects of the above treatments would tend to be nullified. Simulated raindrop size, natural, and system variation caused lack of significant results.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Soil permeability.; Water -- Storage -- Arizona.; Runoff -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Watershed Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Cluff, C. Brent

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe influence of sodium chloride and gravel treatments on infiltration.en_US
dc.creatorPowers, William Riley,1943-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPowers, William Riley,1943-en_US
dc.date.issued1969en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDuring the summer of 1967, two experimental sites (Atterbury and Santa Rita) were fenced, and 12 runoff plots were installed at each site. A modified Purdue Sprinkling infiltrometer was used to determine the infiltration capacities of all plots. After calibration, four treatments were applied, and the infiltration capacities were determined for treatment effects. Each of four treatments (control, sodium chloride, gravel mulch, and a sodium chloride and gravel mulch) were replicated three times. Runoff from natural rainfall events was recorded for correlation with infiltration events. Analyses of variance and covariance analyses were utilized to evaluate treatment effects upon infiltration. For the system used, no significant treatment effects upon infiltration capacities were found. All plots showed an increase in infiltration capacity after treatment. A decrease in bulk density caused by insect activity and latent root growth of spring annuals might be the cause for increased infiltration capacities. The drop size classification of the simulated rainfall showed that 8l.67 of the drops were less than 1.167 irnu. With this drop size, soil disturbance could be minimal, and the effects of the above treatments would tend to be nullified. Simulated raindrop size, natural, and system variation caused lack of significant results.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSoil permeability.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Storage -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRunoff -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWatershed Managementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairCluff, C. Brenten_US
dc.identifier.oclc213413202en_US
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