Sport fish production and productivity relationships in reclaimed domestic wastewater.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191524
Title:
Sport fish production and productivity relationships in reclaimed domestic wastewater.
Author:
Hallock, Robert James,1943-
Issue Date:
1969
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of reclaimed domestic wastewater for a sport fishery. The water was reclaimed by a tertiary treatment of sand filtration. The fish tested were Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, and Malacca Tilapia hybrids. The major objectives were to establish survival rates, growth rates, stocking schedules, and maximum stocking densities for these fish in an unusual and highly productive environment. Less than 1% survival occurred in five trout experiments and in one catfish experiment. An important cause of mortality was low sunrise oxygen tensions resulting from respiration of dense phytoplankton blooms which were stimulated in part by high (14 mg/l) average inflow orthophosphate concentrations. When fish survived, production was high, The total yields of acceptable Channel catfish and Tilapia were 383 and 397 Kg per hectare, respectively, Chironomus larvae, the predominant food organism, comprised 90 of the estimated annual benthic production of 14,180 Kg per hectare. Zooplankters, although abundant, were not an important source of fish food because of their small size, Phytoplankton productivity averaged 10.2 gm O₂ per m³ per day. The present waters, although highly productive, cannot be expected to support a dependable fishery because occasional unfavorable oxygen conditions are likely to reoccur.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Fish ponds -- Arizona.; Water reuse -- Arizona -- Tucson.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Biological Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ziebell, Charles D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSport fish production and productivity relationships in reclaimed domestic wastewater.en_US
dc.creatorHallock, Robert James,1943-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHallock, Robert James,1943-en_US
dc.date.issued1969en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of reclaimed domestic wastewater for a sport fishery. The water was reclaimed by a tertiary treatment of sand filtration. The fish tested were Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, and Malacca Tilapia hybrids. The major objectives were to establish survival rates, growth rates, stocking schedules, and maximum stocking densities for these fish in an unusual and highly productive environment. Less than 1% survival occurred in five trout experiments and in one catfish experiment. An important cause of mortality was low sunrise oxygen tensions resulting from respiration of dense phytoplankton blooms which were stimulated in part by high (14 mg/l) average inflow orthophosphate concentrations. When fish survived, production was high, The total yields of acceptable Channel catfish and Tilapia were 383 and 397 Kg per hectare, respectively, Chironomus larvae, the predominant food organism, comprised 90 of the estimated annual benthic production of 14,180 Kg per hectare. Zooplankters, although abundant, were not an important source of fish food because of their small size, Phytoplankton productivity averaged 10.2 gm O₂ per m³ per day. The present waters, although highly productive, cannot be expected to support a dependable fishery because occasional unfavorable oxygen conditions are likely to reoccur.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFish ponds -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater reuse -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairZiebell, Charles D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213413001en_US
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