The gravel cover and catchment efficiency in the plastic-lined catchment.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191521
Title:
The gravel cover and catchment efficiency in the plastic-lined catchment.
Author:
Kirkland, Larry Allan,1942-
Issue Date:
1969
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Seventy percent of the precipitation which falls on the United States and 90 to 95 percent of that which falls on the arid Southwest is lost to evapotranspiration. Water harvesting is a means for salvaging some of this loss and alleviating the growing water problem. Catchments are the most efficient means of harvesting water in arid regions. Currently, however, their use as a source of water for irrigation is uneconomical, but they are practical for supplying water for wildlife, livestock, and domestic uses where there is no inexpensive surface or well water available. In this study one type of relatively inexpensive catchment, the gravel-covered polyethylene-lined type, is considered. The protective gravel cover, which can be the most costly material item in the construction of the catchment if imported, is evaluated. The effect of soil in the gravel cover and other factors affecting catchment efficiency are also considered. It was concluded that the gravel-covered polyethylene-lined catchment can provide relatively inexpensive, clear, high-quality water in low-rainfall areas if gravel is available near the site and the construction is properly carried out.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Evaporation control.; Gravel.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Thorud, D. B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe gravel cover and catchment efficiency in the plastic-lined catchment.en_US
dc.creatorKirkland, Larry Allan,1942-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKirkland, Larry Allan,1942-en_US
dc.date.issued1969en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeventy percent of the precipitation which falls on the United States and 90 to 95 percent of that which falls on the arid Southwest is lost to evapotranspiration. Water harvesting is a means for salvaging some of this loss and alleviating the growing water problem. Catchments are the most efficient means of harvesting water in arid regions. Currently, however, their use as a source of water for irrigation is uneconomical, but they are practical for supplying water for wildlife, livestock, and domestic uses where there is no inexpensive surface or well water available. In this study one type of relatively inexpensive catchment, the gravel-covered polyethylene-lined type, is considered. The protective gravel cover, which can be the most costly material item in the construction of the catchment if imported, is evaluated. The effect of soil in the gravel cover and other factors affecting catchment efficiency are also considered. It was concluded that the gravel-covered polyethylene-lined catchment can provide relatively inexpensive, clear, high-quality water in low-rainfall areas if gravel is available near the site and the construction is properly carried out.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEvaporation control.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGravel.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairThorud, D. B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarmody, T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaddock, T.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213412654en_US
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