Congressional committee oversight: the case of the Office of Saline Water.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191506
Title:
Congressional committee oversight: the case of the Office of Saline Water.
Author:
Goss, Carol.
Issue Date:
1968
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Congressional committee oversight is conceived of as a continuous process which begins when legislators institute a program to care for a public problem, and persists for the life of the program The process is characterized by the authoritative position of the legislative participants, the specialized knowledge of the executive branch participants, and their mutual responsibility for the development and revision of program policy The study of Office of Saline Water oversight indicates that legislative branch participants are likely to initiate policy only when most of the following conditions are present: minimum negative feedback generated by the program, high legislative participant interest, legislative committee strength in parent chambers, low confidence in agency administrators, weak agency in terms of established clientele and position in administrative hierarchy, Presidential indifference, and presence of the opposition party in the White House. Institutional factors seem to favor -innovation by Senate overseers and review by House overseers In the absence of a cluster of conditions favorable to legislative initiative, House participants are likely to intensify review activities and to place restrictive modifications on administration proposals, while Senate participants are likely to ratify administration recommendations and act as mediators between the House and the administration.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; United States -- Politics and government.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Government; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Jones, Charles O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCongressional committee oversight: the case of the Office of Saline Water.en_US
dc.creatorGoss, Carol.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoss, Carol.en_US
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCongressional committee oversight is conceived of as a continuous process which begins when legislators institute a program to care for a public problem, and persists for the life of the program The process is characterized by the authoritative position of the legislative participants, the specialized knowledge of the executive branch participants, and their mutual responsibility for the development and revision of program policy The study of Office of Saline Water oversight indicates that legislative branch participants are likely to initiate policy only when most of the following conditions are present: minimum negative feedback generated by the program, high legislative participant interest, legislative committee strength in parent chambers, low confidence in agency administrators, weak agency in terms of established clientele and position in administrative hierarchy, Presidential indifference, and presence of the opposition party in the White House. Institutional factors seem to favor -innovation by Senate overseers and review by House overseers In the absence of a cluster of conditions favorable to legislative initiative, House participants are likely to intensify review activities and to place restrictive modifications on administration proposals, while Senate participants are likely to ratify administration recommendations and act as mediators between the House and the administration.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Politics and government.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGovernmenten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairJones, Charles O.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc225187738en_US
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