An engineering and economic feasibility study for diversion of Central Arizona Project waters from alternate sites.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191503
Title:
An engineering and economic feasibility study for diversion of Central Arizona Project waters from alternate sites.
Author:
Little, William Martin,1944-
Issue Date:
1968
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Alternate surface diversion routes for the Central Arizona Project aqueduct are presented, extending from 1) Lake Powell, 2) the proposed Marble Canyon Reservoir, 3) the proposed Hualapai (Bridge Canyon) Reservoir, and 4) Lake Mead to a common terminus at Granite Reef Dam on the Salt River. The routes are compared with each other and with the proposed Granite Reef Aqueduct. Estimated capital costs, operation and maintenance charges, and power costs/revenues are analyzed in yearly cash flows. A most economical route Is chosen by the criterion of least annual cost. Non-quantifiable benefits and costs are examined when they tend to alter the choice of a most feasible route. Under all of the assumptions considered, the most economically attractive route appears to be the proposed Granite Reef Aqueduct, with the most economical alternative being the Hualapai route. Certain nonquantifiable benefits accrue to the latter which tend to close the cost gap.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Water-supply -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Lewis, D. D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn engineering and economic feasibility study for diversion of Central Arizona Project waters from alternate sites.en_US
dc.creatorLittle, William Martin,1944-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLittle, William Martin,1944-en_US
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlternate surface diversion routes for the Central Arizona Project aqueduct are presented, extending from 1) Lake Powell, 2) the proposed Marble Canyon Reservoir, 3) the proposed Hualapai (Bridge Canyon) Reservoir, and 4) Lake Mead to a common terminus at Granite Reef Dam on the Salt River. The routes are compared with each other and with the proposed Granite Reef Aqueduct. Estimated capital costs, operation and maintenance charges, and power costs/revenues are analyzed in yearly cash flows. A most economical route Is chosen by the criterion of least annual cost. Non-quantifiable benefits and costs are examined when they tend to alter the choice of a most feasible route. Under all of the assumptions considered, the most economically attractive route appears to be the proposed Granite Reef Aqueduct, with the most economical alternative being the Hualapai route. Certain nonquantifiable benefits accrue to the latter which tend to close the cost gap.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLewis, D. D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc225156625en_US
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