Radiative properties of rock types in the Harquahala Plains area, Arizona, and possible meteorological implications

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191473
Title:
Radiative properties of rock types in the Harquahala Plains area, Arizona, and possible meteorological implications
Author:
Meyer, William,1939-
Issue Date:
1966
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Radiation from the ground surface into the overlying atmosphere during summertime in Southern Arizona constitutes a major reason for convectional overturn of the moist, unstable air occurring over the state at this time. Radiation = f (T) and for a given rock type in the field, T=g (Q(s), α, κ) where Q(s) = incident solar radiation, α=albedo, κ=thermal diffusivity. The relative quantities of visible energy absorbed by each of the six main rock types occurring in the Harquahala Plains area was measured coincident with measurements of temperature change versus time atl inch depth for a day over each of the rock types in question. This data allowed computations of the temperature variation with time in each of the rock types assuming an average daily insolation value for July. Outgoing radiation, (I(1)), from each of the rock types was computed from the relationship: I(1)= σT^4 where T=absolute temperature, σ=Stefan’s constant. The greater the magnitude of I(1), then the greater the probability for convectional rainfall to occur. Thus, the relative values of I(1) throughout the Plain area establish a possible ordered preference for convective rainfall. These values were then compared with rainfall/unit area measured over each of the rock types by radar for one summer rainy season and the results obtained seemed to indicate that for those rock types constituting a significant portion of the total area, a relationship between radiation and rainfall/unit area does exist in that the regions of larger I(1) experienced greater rainfall totals per unit area.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Rain and rainfall -- Arizona.; Meteorology -- Arizona.; Atmospheric temperature.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Simpson, Eugene S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRadiative properties of rock types in the Harquahala Plains area, Arizona, and possible meteorological implicationsen_US
dc.creatorMeyer, William,1939-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, William,1939-en_US
dc.date.issued1966en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRadiation from the ground surface into the overlying atmosphere during summertime in Southern Arizona constitutes a major reason for convectional overturn of the moist, unstable air occurring over the state at this time. Radiation = f (T) and for a given rock type in the field, T=g (Q(s), α, κ) where Q(s) = incident solar radiation, α=albedo, κ=thermal diffusivity. The relative quantities of visible energy absorbed by each of the six main rock types occurring in the Harquahala Plains area was measured coincident with measurements of temperature change versus time atl inch depth for a day over each of the rock types in question. This data allowed computations of the temperature variation with time in each of the rock types assuming an average daily insolation value for July. Outgoing radiation, (I(1)), from each of the rock types was computed from the relationship: I(1)= σT^4 where T=absolute temperature, σ=Stefan’s constant. The greater the magnitude of I(1), then the greater the probability for convectional rainfall to occur. Thus, the relative values of I(1) throughout the Plain area establish a possible ordered preference for convective rainfall. These values were then compared with rainfall/unit area measured over each of the rock types by radar for one summer rainy season and the results obtained seemed to indicate that for those rock types constituting a significant portion of the total area, a relationship between radiation and rainfall/unit area does exist in that the regions of larger I(1) experienced greater rainfall totals per unit area.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRain and rainfall -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMeteorology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAtmospheric temperature.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBattan, L. F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSellers, W. D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc214138392en_US
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