Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191468
Title:
Avian utilization of desert waterholes
Author:
Gubanich, Alan A.(Alan Andrew),1942-
Issue Date:
1966
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
During the summer of 1965 three waterholes were observed in southern Arizona to see how they were utilized by the avifauna of the surrounding areas. Some species of birds, such as the White-winged Dove and Mourning Dove, were constant visitors at the waterholes and require free water to survive in their desert habitat. Other desert species, such as the Verdin, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher, and Cactus Wren, are not dependent upon this free water for their survival. A number of transient birds use waterholes while migrating through the area. Temperature influences the doves' utilization of the waterholes. During cool periods they do not appear to visit free water as often as during hot periods. Rainfall causes a marked decrease in the number of birds drinking at the waterholes. The birds are then apparently utilizing pothole water. White-winged Doves and Mourning Doves will water frequently, probably every day. Individual doves will sometimes drink as often as three or four times in one day; most drink only once or twice in the same day. They will utilize more than one waterhole and may travel as far as twelve miles to reach water.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Birds -- Behavior -- Arizona.; Desert ecology -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Zoology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Russell, Stephen M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAvian utilization of desert waterholesen_US
dc.creatorGubanich, Alan A.(Alan Andrew),1942-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGubanich, Alan A.(Alan Andrew),1942-en_US
dc.date.issued1966en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDuring the summer of 1965 three waterholes were observed in southern Arizona to see how they were utilized by the avifauna of the surrounding areas. Some species of birds, such as the White-winged Dove and Mourning Dove, were constant visitors at the waterholes and require free water to survive in their desert habitat. Other desert species, such as the Verdin, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher, and Cactus Wren, are not dependent upon this free water for their survival. A number of transient birds use waterholes while migrating through the area. Temperature influences the doves' utilization of the waterholes. During cool periods they do not appear to visit free water as often as during hot periods. Rainfall causes a marked decrease in the number of birds drinking at the waterholes. The birds are then apparently utilizing pothole water. White-winged Doves and Mourning Doves will water frequently, probably every day. Individual doves will sometimes drink as often as three or four times in one day; most drink only once or twice in the same day. They will utilize more than one waterhole and may travel as far as twelve miles to reach water.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBirds -- Behavior -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDesert ecology -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineZoologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRussell, Stephen M.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213890387en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.