Relation of the chemistry of inflow waters to organic productivity in small fishing impoundments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191464
Title:
Relation of the chemistry of inflow waters to organic productivity in small fishing impoundments
Author:
Kemmerer, Andrew J.(Andrew Joseph),1938-
Issue Date:
1965
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In order to determine effects of the chemistry of inflow waters on organic productivity in small fishing impoundments, water samples were collected from streams tributary to 12. lakes located in . northern and southern Arizona. The relative magnitude of productivity in the impoundments was determined from gross primary productivity measurements or from growth rates of fingerling trout. Other possible sources of nutrient salts and differences in the chemical composition of streams during different flood stages were investigated. Increasing concentrations of alkalinity, expressed as calcium carbonate, total phosphate and nitrate, were found to favor increased lake productivity although their effects were regulated to some degree by the morphological characteristics of the lake basin. The physical and geological features of a lake's watershed were dominant factors determining the chemical quality of waters flowing into the lake. Water draining sedimentary rocks, especially those containing limestone, generally contained higher concentrations of dissolved salts than that which drained igneous and metamorphic rock formations. Water from watersheds with very steep slopes, regardless of the geological formations, however, were found to contain very low concentrations of dissolved minerals.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Fishes -- Effect of water quality on.; Fish culture -- Water-supply.; Water quality management.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Wildlife Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
McConnell, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRelation of the chemistry of inflow waters to organic productivity in small fishing impoundmentsen_US
dc.creatorKemmerer, Andrew J.(Andrew Joseph),1938-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKemmerer, Andrew J.(Andrew Joseph),1938-en_US
dc.date.issued1965en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn order to determine effects of the chemistry of inflow waters on organic productivity in small fishing impoundments, water samples were collected from streams tributary to 12. lakes located in . northern and southern Arizona. The relative magnitude of productivity in the impoundments was determined from gross primary productivity measurements or from growth rates of fingerling trout. Other possible sources of nutrient salts and differences in the chemical composition of streams during different flood stages were investigated. Increasing concentrations of alkalinity, expressed as calcium carbonate, total phosphate and nitrate, were found to favor increased lake productivity although their effects were regulated to some degree by the morphological characteristics of the lake basin. The physical and geological features of a lake's watershed were dominant factors determining the chemical quality of waters flowing into the lake. Water draining sedimentary rocks, especially those containing limestone, generally contained higher concentrations of dissolved salts than that which drained igneous and metamorphic rock formations. Water from watersheds with very steep slopes, regardless of the geological formations, however, were found to contain very low concentrations of dissolved minerals.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFishes -- Effect of water quality on.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFish culture -- Water-supply.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater quality management.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWildlife Managementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcConnell, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213888539en_US
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