Subsurface stratigraphy and hydrology of the Rillito Creek-Tanque Verde Wash area, Tucson, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191435
Title:
Subsurface stratigraphy and hydrology of the Rillito Creek-Tanque Verde Wash area, Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Streitz, Robert Keith,1932-
Issue Date:
1962
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Rillito Creek-Tanque Verde Wash area is divided into two physiographic and hydrologic areas by Rillito Creek. The northern or Catalina Foothills area is a dissected pediment composed of Pliocene(?) red beds which are relatively impermeable. South of Rillito Creek is an area of moderately permeable valley-fill deposits of Tertiary-Quaternary(?) age. These valley-fill deposits contain the major water supply for the City of Tucson. Because of the depletion of this reservoir, interest in its geologic and hydrologic nature is demanding more attention. It was found that generalized stratigraphic sections may be made from water-well drillers logs by grouping logs of somewhat similar appearance into composite logs from which correlations may be made. Well cuttings, when secured and handled carefully, provide much more useful data than well logs alone. Samples of this type give an indication of the porosity, permeability, petrology, and depositional environment of the sedimentary units represented. The thickness of the valley-fill sediments is as yet undetermined; the specific yield of the area is not known and can only be estimated with the incomplete data. The fine- grained character of the subsurface sediments and the large demand for water somewhat account for the rapidly declining water table. Surface runoff accounts for a large percentage of the total amount of water leaving the Tucson basin. Because of evaporation, a large part of this surface water is lost from any beneficial use. The future water-supply problem may be somewhat alleviated if this runoff water is injected into the subsurface reservoir as artificial recharge.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Geology -- Arizona -- Pima County.; Groundwater -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Arizona -- Rillito River.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harshbarger, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSubsurface stratigraphy and hydrology of the Rillito Creek-Tanque Verde Wash area, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorStreitz, Robert Keith,1932-en_US
dc.contributor.authorStreitz, Robert Keith,1932-en_US
dc.date.issued1962en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Rillito Creek-Tanque Verde Wash area is divided into two physiographic and hydrologic areas by Rillito Creek. The northern or Catalina Foothills area is a dissected pediment composed of Pliocene(?) red beds which are relatively impermeable. South of Rillito Creek is an area of moderately permeable valley-fill deposits of Tertiary-Quaternary(?) age. These valley-fill deposits contain the major water supply for the City of Tucson. Because of the depletion of this reservoir, interest in its geologic and hydrologic nature is demanding more attention. It was found that generalized stratigraphic sections may be made from water-well drillers logs by grouping logs of somewhat similar appearance into composite logs from which correlations may be made. Well cuttings, when secured and handled carefully, provide much more useful data than well logs alone. Samples of this type give an indication of the porosity, permeability, petrology, and depositional environment of the sedimentary units represented. The thickness of the valley-fill sediments is as yet undetermined; the specific yield of the area is not known and can only be estimated with the incomplete data. The fine- grained character of the subsurface sediments and the large demand for water somewhat account for the rapidly declining water table. Surface runoff accounts for a large percentage of the total amount of water leaving the Tucson basin. Because of evaporation, a large part of this surface water is lost from any beneficial use. The future water-supply problem may be somewhat alleviated if this runoff water is injected into the subsurface reservoir as artificial recharge.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGeology -- Arizona -- Pima County.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology -- Arizona -- Rillito River.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarshbarger, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc218253076en_US
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