The relationship of ground water to alluvium in the Tucson area, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191416
Title:
The relationship of ground water to alluvium in the Tucson area, Arizona
Author:
Kidwai, Zamir Uddin,1922-
Issue Date:
1957
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The upper Santa Cruz basin in southern Arizona is typical of the Basin and Range province0 Mountains surrounding the basin consist of many types of rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Cenozoic. Operation of a variety of erosional and depositional processes have resulted in an alluvial complex of basin fill, The geologic factors controlling the formation of the valley fill determine the textural and structural relationships which control the occurrence and movement of ground water within the basin0 The pattern of ground-, water contours clearly shows the broad outlines of the geologic control of ground water, A study of logs and samples of water wells was made in an attempt to show the extent to which they might be useful in relating known hydrologic properties of the basin to the geologic factors, It is shown that material usually described as "valley fill" consists of Recent alluvium of variable thickness along the main stream channels, an older, Pleistocene alluvial fill that underlies the basin to a probable depth of about 550 feet in most places, and Miocene(?) beds, probably correlative with the Pantano beds or the lower member of the Rillito beds, below this. Study of well samples shows that the permeability of the older alluvium is roughly inversely proportional to the amount of Caliche in it, and also that some wells near the flood plains of main streams produce water from this older, rather than the Recent alluvium0 Well samples are useful in correlating sediments between wells very near each other, but such correlations cannot be extended over large parts of the basin0 A study of well logs is shown to be the cheapest and quickest method for studying the broad depositional and structural outlines of the basin.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater -- Arizona -- Tucson Region.; Alluvium.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Lance, John F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe relationship of ground water to alluvium in the Tucson area, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorKidwai, Zamir Uddin,1922-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKidwai, Zamir Uddin,1922-en_US
dc.date.issued1957en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe upper Santa Cruz basin in southern Arizona is typical of the Basin and Range province0 Mountains surrounding the basin consist of many types of rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Cenozoic. Operation of a variety of erosional and depositional processes have resulted in an alluvial complex of basin fill, The geologic factors controlling the formation of the valley fill determine the textural and structural relationships which control the occurrence and movement of ground water within the basin0 The pattern of ground-, water contours clearly shows the broad outlines of the geologic control of ground water, A study of logs and samples of water wells was made in an attempt to show the extent to which they might be useful in relating known hydrologic properties of the basin to the geologic factors, It is shown that material usually described as "valley fill" consists of Recent alluvium of variable thickness along the main stream channels, an older, Pleistocene alluvial fill that underlies the basin to a probable depth of about 550 feet in most places, and Miocene(?) beds, probably correlative with the Pantano beds or the lower member of the Rillito beds, below this. Study of well samples shows that the permeability of the older alluvium is roughly inversely proportional to the amount of Caliche in it, and also that some wells near the flood plains of main streams produce water from this older, rather than the Recent alluvium0 Well samples are useful in correlating sediments between wells very near each other, but such correlations cannot be extended over large parts of the basin0 A study of well logs is shown to be the cheapest and quickest method for studying the broad depositional and structural outlines of the basin.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Arizona -- Tucson Region.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAlluvium.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLance, John F.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc217286354en_US
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