Confusion where ground and surface waters meet : Gila River General Adjudication, Arizona, and the search for subflow

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191390
Title:
Confusion where ground and surface waters meet : Gila River General Adjudication, Arizona, and the search for subflow
Author:
Sobczak, Robert Valentine.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Arizona is presently in the midst of a general adjudication for the Gila River system -- the watershed which comprises the southern two-thirds of the state. The purpose of the adjudication is to prioritize all water claims in the river system: both state-established and federally reserved rights. Arizona adheres to a bifurcated (or divided) system of water law which only recognizes a component of ground water -- called subflow -- to be appropriable. Wells which pump non-appropriable water -- called tributary flow -- are not to be included in the adjudication. The problem is that federal laws do not recognize this artificial bifurcation. The challenge lies in identifying a subflow zone which satisfies the hydrologic fiction of existing state precedents and the hydrologic reality of federal statutes. At the core of the problem lies the fate of Arizona's perennial stream water and the fulfillment of federally reserved tribal water rights. Thus, larger questions loom: can Arizona law reconcile its glutinous past with a water-scarce future, will the adjudication ever reach a finality, and even if it does, will it be a finality that all sides can live with?
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater flow -- Arizona.; Streamflow -- Arizona.; Water rights -- Arizona.; Groundwater -- Arizona.; Indians of North America -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Maddock, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleConfusion where ground and surface waters meet : Gila River General Adjudication, Arizona, and the search for subflowen_US
dc.creatorSobczak, Robert Valentine.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSobczak, Robert Valentine.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractArizona is presently in the midst of a general adjudication for the Gila River system -- the watershed which comprises the southern two-thirds of the state. The purpose of the adjudication is to prioritize all water claims in the river system: both state-established and federally reserved rights. Arizona adheres to a bifurcated (or divided) system of water law which only recognizes a component of ground water -- called subflow -- to be appropriable. Wells which pump non-appropriable water -- called tributary flow -- are not to be included in the adjudication. The problem is that federal laws do not recognize this artificial bifurcation. The challenge lies in identifying a subflow zone which satisfies the hydrologic fiction of existing state precedents and the hydrologic reality of federal statutes. At the core of the problem lies the fate of Arizona's perennial stream water and the fulfillment of federally reserved tribal water rights. Thus, larger questions loom: can Arizona law reconcile its glutinous past with a water-scarce future, will the adjudication ever reach a finality, and even if it does, will it be a finality that all sides can live with?en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater flow -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStreamflow -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater rights -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIndians of North America -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMaddock, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlennon, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNish, Robert Macen_US
dc.identifier.oclc225865417en_US
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