Reduction of enteric organisms in small scale, subsurface flow constructed wetlands

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191386
Title:
Reduction of enteric organisms in small scale, subsurface flow constructed wetlands
Author:
Nokes, Rita Lynn.
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Constructed wetlands can play a critical role in wastewater treatment for rural areas. It has been demonstrated that large constructed wetlands are useful in the reduction of enteric microorganisms. This study evaluated the ability of three small scale, subsurface wetlands to remove total coliforms, fecal coliforms, bacteriophage, Giardia, and Cryptasporidium. These wetlands have three different vegetation densities: no vegetation, partially vegetated, and completely vegetated. Influent and effluent water samples for each wetland were tested for the presence of the microorganisms. In the wetland with no vegetation, total coliform, fecal coliform, bacteriophage, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium percent reductions were 93.5, 95.4, 61.5, >97.8, and 77.1, respectively. In the partially vegetated wetland, percent reduction of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, bacteriophage, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were 91.0, 96.1, 86.6, >98.6, and >44.3, respectively. Percent removal was greatest in the wetland that was completely vegetated. Total coliforms were reduced by 97.3 percent, fecal coliforms by 99.5 percent, and bacteriophage by 97.1 percent. These results indicate that small scale constructed wetlands can be useful in wastewater treatment and that vegetation may play a role in enteric microorganism removal.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Constructed wetlands -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona.; Enterobacteriaceae -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil, Water, and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReduction of enteric organisms in small scale, subsurface flow constructed wetlandsen_US
dc.creatorNokes, Rita Lynn.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNokes, Rita Lynn.en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractConstructed wetlands can play a critical role in wastewater treatment for rural areas. It has been demonstrated that large constructed wetlands are useful in the reduction of enteric microorganisms. This study evaluated the ability of three small scale, subsurface wetlands to remove total coliforms, fecal coliforms, bacteriophage, Giardia, and Cryptasporidium. These wetlands have three different vegetation densities: no vegetation, partially vegetated, and completely vegetated. Influent and effluent water samples for each wetland were tested for the presence of the microorganisms. In the wetland with no vegetation, total coliform, fecal coliform, bacteriophage, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium percent reductions were 93.5, 95.4, 61.5, >97.8, and 77.1, respectively. In the partially vegetated wetland, percent reduction of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, bacteriophage, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were 91.0, 96.1, 86.6, >98.6, and >44.3, respectively. Percent removal was greatest in the wetland that was completely vegetated. Total coliforms were reduced by 97.3 percent, fecal coliforms by 99.5 percent, and bacteriophage by 97.1 percent. These results indicate that small scale constructed wetlands can be useful in wastewater treatment and that vegetation may play a role in enteric microorganism removal.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshConstructed wetlands -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEnterobacteriaceae -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water, and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrye, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.oclc227006905en_US
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