The Impact of Bacterial Cell Growth and Microbial Lag on the Transport and Biodegradation of Organic Compounds

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191381
Title:
The Impact of Bacterial Cell Growth and Microbial Lag on the Transport and Biodegradation of Organic Compounds
Author:
Snyder, Susannah Kathleen.
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to examine the impact of microbial variables (such as cell growth and metabolic lag) on the biodegradation and transport of salicylate, a model hydrocarbon compound. For each experiment, a soil column was inoculated with bacteria that contained the NAH plasmid encoding genes for the degradation of naphthalene and salicylate, and then subjected to a step input of salicylate solution. Oxygen availability, cell growth, and microbial lag were each examined to determine their effect on the characteristic shape of the salicylate breakthrough curve. For all cases examined, the transport behavior of salicylate was nonsteady. While sparging the influent solution with oxygen increased the total amount of salicylate that was degraded in the column, it did not influence the shape of its initial breakthrough behavior. The effect of microbial lag on the shape of the salicylate breakthrough curve was eliminated in a second substrate pulse by exposing the column to two successive pulses of salicylate, thereby allowing the organisms to acclimate to the carbon source during the first pulse. The cause of the lag was further investigated using succinate, a TCA intermediate that was expected to have minimal metabolic lag. Thus, any lag effects would most likely be related to physiological lag. A very slight lag was observed in the succinate breakthrough curve, indicating that physiological lag was minimal in these systems. This implies that metabolic lag is the primary behavior observed in the characteristic nonsteady transport behavior of salicylate. Elimination of microbial lag effects allowed the impact of bacterial growth on salicylate breakthrough to be quantified.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Organic compounds -- Biodegradation.; Cells -- Growth.; Bacterial growth.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Bacterial Cell Growth and Microbial Lag on the Transport and Biodegradation of Organic Compoundsen_US
dc.creatorSnyder, Susannah Kathleen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, Susannah Kathleen.en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMiscible-displacement experiments were conducted to examine the impact of microbial variables (such as cell growth and metabolic lag) on the biodegradation and transport of salicylate, a model hydrocarbon compound. For each experiment, a soil column was inoculated with bacteria that contained the NAH plasmid encoding genes for the degradation of naphthalene and salicylate, and then subjected to a step input of salicylate solution. Oxygen availability, cell growth, and microbial lag were each examined to determine their effect on the characteristic shape of the salicylate breakthrough curve. For all cases examined, the transport behavior of salicylate was nonsteady. While sparging the influent solution with oxygen increased the total amount of salicylate that was degraded in the column, it did not influence the shape of its initial breakthrough behavior. The effect of microbial lag on the shape of the salicylate breakthrough curve was eliminated in a second substrate pulse by exposing the column to two successive pulses of salicylate, thereby allowing the organisms to acclimate to the carbon source during the first pulse. The cause of the lag was further investigated using succinate, a TCA intermediate that was expected to have minimal metabolic lag. Thus, any lag effects would most likely be related to physiological lag. A very slight lag was observed in the succinate breakthrough curve, indicating that physiological lag was minimal in these systems. This implies that metabolic lag is the primary behavior observed in the characteristic nonsteady transport behavior of salicylate. Elimination of microbial lag effects allowed the impact of bacterial growth on salicylate breakthrough to be quantified.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshOrganic compounds -- Biodegradation.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCells -- Growth.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBacterial growth.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc214411216en_US
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