Contaminant transport and mass transfer to runoff including infiltration

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191360
Title:
Contaminant transport and mass transfer to runoff including infiltration
Author:
Weber, Sofie Aimee.
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Experiments were conducted in a flume (3.0 meter long, 0.3 meter wide by 0.3 meter deep) to examine chemical loss to surface runoff. The bottom of the flume was made of a perforated steel plate, which allowed infiltration to occur during the runoff event. Three experiments were conducted. The objective of the first experiment was to introduce a calcium chloride solution as surface flow into the flume which was pre-saturated with calcium bromide. This experiment allowed the transfer of chemicals from soil to runoff to be examined. The second experiment was the reverse of the first experiment, i.e. the soil was saturated with calcium chloride and the surface flow contained calcium bromide. This experiment was done to examine chemical transport from runoff to the soil. In the last experiment, the soil was saturated with a mixture of calcium bromide, sodium benzoate, and pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and the surface flow contained calcium chloride. The sodium benzoate was chosen to examine biodegradation. The PFBA and bromide, both non-reactive tracers, have different aqueous diffusion coefficients. The results obtained for these two were compared to help determine if the mass transfer in the soil mainly is due to flow, or if diffusion contributes. With this research it has been shown that there are several factors influencing chemical loss to runoff infiltration, biodegradation, and there are also suggestions that there is transfer due to diffusion processes.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Sediment transport.; Nonpoint source pollution.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil, Water, and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleContaminant transport and mass transfer to runoff including infiltrationen_US
dc.creatorWeber, Sofie Aimee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Sofie Aimee.en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExperiments were conducted in a flume (3.0 meter long, 0.3 meter wide by 0.3 meter deep) to examine chemical loss to surface runoff. The bottom of the flume was made of a perforated steel plate, which allowed infiltration to occur during the runoff event. Three experiments were conducted. The objective of the first experiment was to introduce a calcium chloride solution as surface flow into the flume which was pre-saturated with calcium bromide. This experiment allowed the transfer of chemicals from soil to runoff to be examined. The second experiment was the reverse of the first experiment, i.e. the soil was saturated with calcium chloride and the surface flow contained calcium bromide. This experiment was done to examine chemical transport from runoff to the soil. In the last experiment, the soil was saturated with a mixture of calcium bromide, sodium benzoate, and pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and the surface flow contained calcium chloride. The sodium benzoate was chosen to examine biodegradation. The PFBA and bromide, both non-reactive tracers, have different aqueous diffusion coefficients. The results obtained for these two were compared to help determine if the mass transfer in the soil mainly is due to flow, or if diffusion contributes. With this research it has been shown that there are several factors influencing chemical loss to runoff infiltration, biodegradation, and there are also suggestions that there is transfer due to diffusion processes.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSediment transport.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNonpoint source pollution.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water, and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaumgartner, Donald J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWierenga, Peter J.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc228033257en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.