N2O emissions from wheat agro-ecosystems under elevated atmospheric CO2

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191358
Title:
N2O emissions from wheat agro-ecosystems under elevated atmospheric CO2
Author:
Weber, Marie Aimee.
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fertilizer-derived nitrous oxide, N20, may cause an increase of tropospheric N20, which could contribute to the destruction of the ozone layer and enhance the "greenhouse effect". The impact of fertilizer on tropospheric N20 may be enhanced by increased carbon dioxide, CO2, which may alter soil N dynamics. The goal of this research was to measure N20 emissions from soil within a field of wheat grown under two levels of atmospheric CO2 (ambient and ambient plus 200 ppm), two irrigation levels (15 and 30% depletion of available water in the root zone), and two levels N-fertilizer (15 and 350 kg N/ha). Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) was planted at the University of Arizona Agricultural Center, Maricopa, Arizona, December 1996 and harvested May 1997 in conjunction with a Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment. Chamber measurements of N20 emissions were made five days during the season. The results showed that emissions were not different for the two different irrigation levels. There was, however, a positive correlation between emissions and air temperature. The elevated CO2 had no statistically significant effect on the N20 emissions.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Atmospheric nitrous oxide -- Environmental aspects.; Carbon dioxide -- Environmental aspects.; Agricultural ecology.; Crops Ecology.; Wheat.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil, Water, and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Matthias, A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleN2O emissions from wheat agro-ecosystems under elevated atmospheric CO2en_US
dc.creatorWeber, Marie Aimee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Marie Aimee.en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFertilizer-derived nitrous oxide, N20, may cause an increase of tropospheric N20, which could contribute to the destruction of the ozone layer and enhance the "greenhouse effect". The impact of fertilizer on tropospheric N20 may be enhanced by increased carbon dioxide, CO2, which may alter soil N dynamics. The goal of this research was to measure N20 emissions from soil within a field of wheat grown under two levels of atmospheric CO2 (ambient and ambient plus 200 ppm), two irrigation levels (15 and 30% depletion of available water in the root zone), and two levels N-fertilizer (15 and 350 kg N/ha). Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) was planted at the University of Arizona Agricultural Center, Maricopa, Arizona, December 1996 and harvested May 1997 in conjunction with a Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment. Chamber measurements of N20 emissions were made five days during the season. The results showed that emissions were not different for the two different irrigation levels. There was, however, a positive correlation between emissions and air temperature. The elevated CO2 had no statistically significant effect on the N20 emissions.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAtmospheric nitrous oxide -- Environmental aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCarbon dioxide -- Environmental aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural ecology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCrops Ecology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWheat.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water, and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMatthias, A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeavitt, Steven W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, James J.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc227011861en_US
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