Assessment of changes in the water-surface profile of the lower canyon of the Little Colorado River, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191350
Title:
Assessment of changes in the water-surface profile of the lower canyon of the Little Colorado River, Arizona
Author:
Persio, Andrew Franklin.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Little Colorado River is the largest tributary of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon and serves as spawning habitat for humpback chub (Gila cypha), an endangered species. The lower Little Colorado River, defined as the reach from Blue Springs to the Colorado River, is a dynamic stream, and its channel morphology and longitudinal profile are controlled by several factors, including debris-flow deposition, travertine deposition, and reworking by streamflow floods. I determined changes in the water-surface profile of the Little Colorado River by comparing data surveyed in 1926 by the U.S. Geological Survey and data extracted from 2002 digital-elevation models. Specific changes to the longitudinal profile can be attributed to travertine-dam formation, which appears to occur more quickly than previously assumed; debris-flow deposition; and boulder transport during occasional large mainstem floods. A debris-flow sediment-yield model was used to determine the worst case scenario of boulder inputs from tributaries blocking spawning runs. A one-dimensional steady state flow model shows the effects of changes in channel conveyance on flow velocities in the lower Little Colorado River. Velocity changes associated with debris-flow deposition could potentially affect the ability of humpback chub to move upstream and spawn in this river.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Flood forecasting -- Little Colorado River (N.M. and Ariz.); Water levels -- Little Colorado River (N.M. and Ariz.) -- Measurement.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Baker, Victor R.; Webb, Robert H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssessment of changes in the water-surface profile of the lower canyon of the Little Colorado River, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorPersio, Andrew Franklin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPersio, Andrew Franklin.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Little Colorado River is the largest tributary of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon and serves as spawning habitat for humpback chub (Gila cypha), an endangered species. The lower Little Colorado River, defined as the reach from Blue Springs to the Colorado River, is a dynamic stream, and its channel morphology and longitudinal profile are controlled by several factors, including debris-flow deposition, travertine deposition, and reworking by streamflow floods. I determined changes in the water-surface profile of the Little Colorado River by comparing data surveyed in 1926 by the U.S. Geological Survey and data extracted from 2002 digital-elevation models. Specific changes to the longitudinal profile can be attributed to travertine-dam formation, which appears to occur more quickly than previously assumed; debris-flow deposition; and boulder transport during occasional large mainstem floods. A debris-flow sediment-yield model was used to determine the worst case scenario of boulder inputs from tributaries blocking spawning runs. A one-dimensional steady state flow model shows the effects of changes in channel conveyance on flow velocities in the lower Little Colorado River. Velocity changes associated with debris-flow deposition could potentially affect the ability of humpback chub to move upstream and spawn in this river.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFlood forecasting -- Little Colorado River (N.M. and Ariz.)en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater levels -- Little Colorado River (N.M. and Ariz.) -- Measurement.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBaker, Victor R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWebb, Robert H.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc226299393en_US
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