Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191348
Title:
Meteoric 36-Cl in the Contiguous United States
Author:
Moysey, Stephen.
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of 36C1 as an environmental tracer of hydrologic processes has become increasingly popular over the last twenty years. The use of this isotope in hydrogeology has been limited, however, by uncertainty in the input function for 36C1 entering groundwater. To address this problem and to evaluate current 36C1/C1 distribution models, 36C1/C1 was measured for 183 groundwater samples collected from sites located throughout the United States. On the continental scale, values of 36C11C1 range from less than 100 x 10-15 in coastal regions to over 1,200 x 1015 in Wyoming. This distribution is dominated by the spatial variability of stable chloride fallout. The depositional flux of 36C1 is approximately constant over the United States with a mean of 21.3+2.7 atoms 111-2S-1 which is equivalent to a global flux of 13.6+1.7 atoms r62s4. A simple model developed in this study, which assumes constant 36C1 deposition, consistently yields high estimates of 36C11C1 in the southwestern part of the country. This discrepancy may indicate that the relative amount of dry to total fallout is an important factor in controlling 36C1/C1 in arid areas and requires further investigation. Variability of 36C11C1 at the local scale is primarily controlled by subsurface sources of chloride. Auxiliary data, such as bromide concentrations, are often useful for identifying and interpreting these localized processes. In this study, three schemes for correcting this effect are explored: i) binary mixing models, ii) scaling by chloride concentrations and iii) scaling by chloride-bromide ratios.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Chlorine -- Isotopes.; Radioisotopes in hydrology.; Hydrogeology -- United States.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Zreda, Marek

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMeteoric 36-Cl in the Contiguous United Statesen_US
dc.creatorMoysey, Stephen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMoysey, Stephen.en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of 36C1 as an environmental tracer of hydrologic processes has become increasingly popular over the last twenty years. The use of this isotope in hydrogeology has been limited, however, by uncertainty in the input function for 36C1 entering groundwater. To address this problem and to evaluate current 36C1/C1 distribution models, 36C1/C1 was measured for 183 groundwater samples collected from sites located throughout the United States. On the continental scale, values of 36C11C1 range from less than 100 x 10-15 in coastal regions to over 1,200 x 1015 in Wyoming. This distribution is dominated by the spatial variability of stable chloride fallout. The depositional flux of 36C1 is approximately constant over the United States with a mean of 21.3+2.7 atoms 111-2S-1 which is equivalent to a global flux of 13.6+1.7 atoms r62s4. A simple model developed in this study, which assumes constant 36C1 deposition, consistently yields high estimates of 36C11C1 in the southwestern part of the country. This discrepancy may indicate that the relative amount of dry to total fallout is an important factor in controlling 36C1/C1 in arid areas and requires further investigation. Variability of 36C11C1 at the local scale is primarily controlled by subsurface sources of chloride. Auxiliary data, such as bromide concentrations, are often useful for identifying and interpreting these localized processes. In this study, three schemes for correcting this effect are explored: i) binary mixing models, ii) scaling by chloride concentrations and iii) scaling by chloride-bromide ratios.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshChlorine -- Isotopes.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRadioisotopes in hydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrogeology -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairZreda, Mareken_US
dc.identifier.oclc213483063en_US
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