Adsorption of VOC vapors at the air-water interface in unsaturated media

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191340
Title:
Adsorption of VOC vapors at the air-water interface in unsaturated media
Author:
Enright, Bryn Alison.
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The sorption of organic vapors to the air-water interface was studied using a wetted gas chromatograph column packed with a diatomaceous earth based media. Data were collected from 22 experiments on heptane, benzene, trichloroethene (TCE), perchioroethene (PCE), p-xylene and toluene at different moisture contents (lO%-30%). Sorption isotherms were constructed and air-water partitioning coefficients calculated. Results showed that sorption of the acyclics was primarily at the air-water interface and the aromatics were controlled by both adsorption at the interface and dissolution. These results also showed that solubility is not always a good indicator of the magnitude of the interface-air distribution coefficient as previous research suggests. The implication of this study is that adsorption to the air-water interface can be significant and must be quantified to accurately predict transport through the vadose zone.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Volatile organic compounds -- Absorption and adsorption.; Zone of aeration.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Conklin, Martha H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAdsorption of VOC vapors at the air-water interface in unsaturated mediaen_US
dc.creatorEnright, Bryn Alison.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEnright, Bryn Alison.en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe sorption of organic vapors to the air-water interface was studied using a wetted gas chromatograph column packed with a diatomaceous earth based media. Data were collected from 22 experiments on heptane, benzene, trichloroethene (TCE), perchioroethene (PCE), p-xylene and toluene at different moisture contents (lO%-30%). Sorption isotherms were constructed and air-water partitioning coefficients calculated. Results showed that sorption of the acyclics was primarily at the air-water interface and the aromatics were controlled by both adsorption at the interface and dissolution. These results also showed that solubility is not always a good indicator of the magnitude of the interface-air distribution coefficient as previous research suggests. The implication of this study is that adsorption to the air-water interface can be significant and must be quantified to accurately predict transport through the vadose zone.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshVolatile organic compounds -- Absorption and adsorption.en_US
dc.subject.lcshZone of aeration.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairConklin, Martha H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBales, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZreda, Mareken_US
dc.identifier.oclc228033500en_US
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