Water, Energy and Carbon Dioxide Exchange of a Riparian Mesquite Woodland

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191339
Title:
Water, Energy and Carbon Dioxide Exchange of a Riparian Mesquite Woodland
Author:
Edwards, Eric Alan.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fluxes of water, energy and carbon dioxide were measured above a riparian mesquite woodland for an entire growing season using the eddy covariance method. Measurements of water vapor and carbon dioxide concentration were contaminated by erroneous measurements caused by sunlight incident on the bottom window of the Infrared Gas Analyzer, although a procedure was developed to remove this influence from the calculated fluxes. Data analysis suggests that daytime fluxes were underestimated by approximately 10%, while nighttime fluxes are difficult to measure accurately as a result of atmospheric stability. The growing season appears approximately bounded by freeze events in the spring and fall. Within the growing season there are two distinct periods characterized by different precipitation regimes. During the early summer months there is little rainfall, and high vapor pressure deficits appear to cause partial stomata' closure in the afternoon, resulting in reduced fluxes of water vapor and carbon dioxide. Later in the year, during the summer monsoons, this closure no longer occurs and the fluxes remain high throughout the afternoon. Annual water vapor flux is approximately 60% of the atmospheric demand, indicating the mesquite trees limit transpiration despite having access to groundwater. Nighttime respiration appears to increase with soil moisture during the summer months, while there is little or no effect of temperature during this time.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Riparian ecology -- San Pedro River (Mexico and Ariz.); Carbon dioxide -- Environmental aspects.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Shuttleworth, William James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWater, Energy and Carbon Dioxide Exchange of a Riparian Mesquite Woodlanden_US
dc.creatorEdwards, Eric Alan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Eric Alan.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFluxes of water, energy and carbon dioxide were measured above a riparian mesquite woodland for an entire growing season using the eddy covariance method. Measurements of water vapor and carbon dioxide concentration were contaminated by erroneous measurements caused by sunlight incident on the bottom window of the Infrared Gas Analyzer, although a procedure was developed to remove this influence from the calculated fluxes. Data analysis suggests that daytime fluxes were underestimated by approximately 10%, while nighttime fluxes are difficult to measure accurately as a result of atmospheric stability. The growing season appears approximately bounded by freeze events in the spring and fall. Within the growing season there are two distinct periods characterized by different precipitation regimes. During the early summer months there is little rainfall, and high vapor pressure deficits appear to cause partial stomata' closure in the afternoon, resulting in reduced fluxes of water vapor and carbon dioxide. Later in the year, during the summer monsoons, this closure no longer occurs and the fluxes remain high throughout the afternoon. Annual water vapor flux is approximately 60% of the atmospheric demand, indicating the mesquite trees limit transpiration despite having access to groundwater. Nighttime respiration appears to increase with soil moisture during the summer months, while there is little or no effect of temperature during this time.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRiparian ecology -- San Pedro River (Mexico and Ariz.)en_US
dc.subject.lcshCarbon dioxide -- Environmental aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairShuttleworth, William Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213471424en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.