Evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction method for the detection of enteroviruses in groundwater impacted by reclaimed wastewater

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191317
Title:
Evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction method for the detection of enteroviruses in groundwater impacted by reclaimed wastewater
Author:
Katner, Adrienne Lee.
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the applicability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of enteroviruses in groundwater impacted by reclaimed wastewater. Samples were analyzed by conventional cell culture assay and the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), semi-nested PCR, sequencing and dot blot probe hybridization. Viruses were detected in 4/20 samples by cell culture compared to 9/20 by RT-PCR. Semi-nested PCR and probe hybridization increased detection sensitivity to 11/20 and 12/20, respectively. Sequencing of seminested PCR products confirmed enteroviral origin of the amplified sequences, suggesting no cross-reactivity of the primers. Chlorine inactivated viruses were not concentrated as efficiently as cell culture detectable virus (90 percent less efficient). Their ability to be detected by PCR decreased by 90% after five days in secondary effluent and nine days in tap water. These results suggest that PCR is a more sensitive approach for the detection of enteroviruses in the environment. Also, chlorine inactivated viruses are less likely to be detected by PCR than cell culture infectious viruses.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Water -- Purification -- Virus removal.; Groundwater -- Pollution.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil, Water and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of a polymerase chain reaction method for the detection of enteroviruses in groundwater impacted by reclaimed wastewateren_US
dc.creatorKatner, Adrienne Lee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKatner, Adrienne Lee.en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe primary objective of this study was to evaluate the applicability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of enteroviruses in groundwater impacted by reclaimed wastewater. Samples were analyzed by conventional cell culture assay and the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), semi-nested PCR, sequencing and dot blot probe hybridization. Viruses were detected in 4/20 samples by cell culture compared to 9/20 by RT-PCR. Semi-nested PCR and probe hybridization increased detection sensitivity to 11/20 and 12/20, respectively. Sequencing of seminested PCR products confirmed enteroviral origin of the amplified sequences, suggesting no cross-reactivity of the primers. Chlorine inactivated viruses were not concentrated as efficiently as cell culture detectable virus (90 percent less efficient). Their ability to be detected by PCR decreased by 90% after five days in secondary effluent and nine days in tap water. These results suggest that PCR is a more sensitive approach for the detection of enteroviruses in the environment. Also, chlorine inactivated viruses are less likely to be detected by PCR than cell culture infectious viruses.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Purification -- Virus removal.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Pollution.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc219711366en_US
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